Psychology & Psychiatry

The mystery of what makes a joke funny—but only to some people

How do you like the following joke from Sumeria in about 1900BC? "Something which has never occurred since time immemorial; a young woman did not fart in her husband's lap." Or this classic from Egypt, 1600BC? "How do you ...

Neuroscience

Clowning around is good for brain health

Trinity College and the Global Brain Health Institute (GBHI) are broadening the discussion on the importance of art for brain health which gives space for perspectives that may help change the narrative on how we view older ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

How humour can change your relationship

A sense of humour is an attractive trait. There is abundant cross cultural evidence that shows that being funny makes you more desirable as a mate, especially if you are a man. But once the initial flirting is over, and you ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

How humour can reduce workplace stress

Research from ANU has found a bit of humour at work can help employees deal with workplace aggression and stressful situations.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Why we look for a partner who laughs (and makes us laugh)

Whether we're looking for love or lust, we look for someone with a good sense of humour. Studies of courtship on Tinder and Facebook show that a sense of humour is the most valued quality in a potential mate.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Humour may not be so good for your health after all

There is a widely held belief that humour is good for your health. The benefits of humour and laughter are linked to every imaginable health outcome. It is claimed that a good old giggle can help reduce pain, boost the immune ...

page 1 from 2