Psychology & Psychiatry

Before they can speak, babies make friends: study

Babies still too small to speak know how to make jokes and form friendships, say researchers at an Australian university who have spent two years filming the behaviour of young children.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Funny people are more intelligent than unfunny peers

Albert Einstein attributed his brilliant mind to having a child-like sense of humour. Indeed, a number of studies have found an association between humour and intelligence.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Why we look for a partner who laughs (and makes us laugh)

Whether we're looking for love or lust, we look for someone with a good sense of humour. Studies of courtship on Tinder and Facebook show that a sense of humour is the most valued quality in a potential mate.

Psychology & Psychiatry

How humour can change your relationship

A sense of humour is an attractive trait. There is abundant cross cultural evidence that shows that being funny makes you more desirable as a mate, especially if you are a man. But once the initial flirting is over, and you ...

Neuroscience

Clowning around is good for brain health

Trinity College and the Global Brain Health Institute (GBHI) are broadening the discussion on the importance of art for brain health which gives space for perspectives that may help change the narrative on how we view older ...

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