Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Could auto-antibodies be linked to severe COVID-19?

Even though COVID-19 manifests as a mild and short-lived disease in most people, some suffer extremely severe symptoms; in the worst cases, these patients die due to complications such as respiratory failure or thromboembolism. ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Customizable AI tool helps pathologists identify diseased cells

It's something nearly any pathologist would welcome: a personally trained assistant that can help them identify abnormal cells in blood samples and biopsies so they can more quickly and accurately diagnose cancer or other ...

Health

Should you worry about your cortisol levels?

If you've spent any time scrolling through health-related TikToks lately, you've probably heard about cortisol. High levels of the so-called "stress hormone" are being blamed for fatigue, headaches, weight gain, mood swings, ...

Immunity (medical)

Immunity is a biological term that describes a state of having sufficient biological defenses to avoid infection, disease, or other unwanted biological invasion. Immunity involves both specific and non-specific components. The non-specific components act either as barriers or as eliminators of wide range of pathogens irrespective of antigenic specificity. Other components of the immune system adapt themselves to each new disease encountered and are able to generate pathogen-specific immunity.

Adaptive immunity is often sub-divided into two major types depending on how the immunity was introduced. Naturally acquired immunity occurs through contact with a disease causing agent, when the contact was not deliberate, whereas artificially acquired immunity develops only through deliberate actions such as vaccination. Both naturally and artificially acquired immunity can be further subdivided depending on whether immunity is induced in the host or passively transferred from a immune host. Passive immunity is acquired through transfer of antibodies or activated T-cells from an immune host, and is short lived, usually lasts only a few months, whereas active immunity is induced in the host itself by antigen, and lasts much longer, sometimes life-long. The diagram below summarizes these divisions of immunity.

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