Sleep apnea

Solutions for leading sleep woes

The 'double whammy' of co-occurring insomnia and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a complex problem best managed with non-drug targeted psych interventions, a new Australian study has found.

Psychology & Psychiatry

A potential cure for sleeplessness

New research from Queen's University's Judith Davidson (Psychology) has shown insomnia can be treated effectively at the family doctor's office without the use of drugs.

Pediatrics

Sleep training for your kids: Why and how it works

For thousands of years, mothers have sung lullabies to help their babies and children fall asleep. In more recent times, gadgets and devices have been invented and marketed to help the tired child—and weary parent.

Health

Study compares different strategies for treating insomnia

New research indicates that for treating insomnia, stimulus control therapy (which reassociates the bed with sleepiness instead of arousal) and sleep restriction therapy are effective, and it is best to use them individually ...

Obstetrics & gynaecology

Cognitive behavioral therapy effective for prenatal insomnia

(HealthDay)—Cognitive behavioral therapy is an effective nonpharmacologic treatment for insomnia during pregnancy, according to a study published online April 5 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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