Oncology & Cancer

Missing molecule hobbles cell movement

Cells missing a certain protein on their surface can't move normally, UConn researchers report in Science Signaling. The research could give insight into how cells move and repair wounds in normal tissue, as well as how cancer ...

Immunology

Researchers discover how sleep can fight infection

Researchers in Germany have discovered why sleep can sometimes be the best medicine. Sleep improves the potential ability of some of the body's immune cells to attach to their targets, according to a new study that will be ...

Immunology

Fever alters immune cells so they can better reach infections

Fever is known to help power up our immune cells, and scientists in Shanghai have new evidence explaining how. They found in mice that fever alters surface proteins on immune cells like lymphocytes to make them better able ...

Medical research

Defense against joint degeneration

During cartilage development, chondrocytes secrete the extracellular matrix (ECM) and embed within the same environment. During progressive joint disease, such as osteoarthritis (OA), dysregulation of the process can lead ...

Oncology & Cancer

Mitochondria come together to kill cancer cells

Targeting a pathway that controls the movement of mitochondria, the powerhouses of all cells, could reduce cancer invasiveness and resistance to radiotherapy.

Oncology & Cancer

New breast cancer stem cell clues may help develop therapeutics

Researchers have identified a new regulatory pathway that may play an important role in basal-like breast cancer (BLBC), a particularly aggressive form of breast cancer often referred to as "triple negative." This pathway ...

Oncology & Cancer

Researchers discover new information on the spread of cancer

A new study from the University of Turku, Finland, shows that intracellular receptor signalling sustains cancer cells that have detached from the surrounding tissue. When the signalling is prevented, the cells cannot spread ...

Oncology & Cancer

Integrin cell adhesion receptors are risky cancer drug targets

A possible cancer treatment strategy might in fact lead to increased metastasis in some cases. This finding from a team of LACDR researchers led by Erik Danen made the cover of the February 11 edition of Science Signaling.

page 1 from 2