Neuroscience

Novel technique helps explain why bright light keeps us awake

In recent decades, scientists have learned a great deal about how different neurons connect and send signals to each other. But it's been difficult to trace the activity of individual nerve fibers known as axons, some of ...

Oncology & Cancer

Drug-light combo could offer control over CAR T-cell therapy

Bioengineers at the University of California San Diego are a step closer to making CAR T-cell therapy safer, more precise and easy to control. They developed a system that allows them to select where and when CAR T cells ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

What you should know about meningitis

Getting the news your child, teenager or even their classmate or friend has meningitis can be an alarming experience. However, knowing more about the disease can help parents recognize the signs and symptoms as well as help ...

Medical research

How to enable light to switch on and off therapeutic antibodies

When antigens such as a virus or bacteria invade our body, the immune system springs into action: it creates antibodies that stick to the antigens so that they can identify and destroy the intruders. Did you know that these ...

page 1 from 23

Light

Light is electromagnetic radiation, particularly radiation of a wavelength that is visible to the human eye (about 400–700 nm, or perhaps 380–750 nm.) In physics, the term light sometimes refers to electromagnetic radiation of any wavelength, whether visible or not.

Three primary properties of light are:

Light, which exists in tiny "packets" called photons, exhibits properties of both waves and particles. This property is referred to as the wave–particle duality. The study of light, known as optics, is an important research area in modern physics.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA