Cardiology

New research reveals how the heart repairs after a heart attack

Immune response and the lymphatic system are central to cardiac repair after a heart attack, according to a study from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago and Northwestern University Feinberg Cardiovascular ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Why do some people get sicker from COVID than others?

COVID-19 vaccines have saved at least a million lives in the United States alone, but for many people, a lingering fear remains: If—or when—they get hit by the coronavirus, just how bad will it be? Will they breeze through ...

Medications

Promising biologic drug for treating chronic lung disease

NUS scientists have discovered a novel property of a protein found in human lungs that could lead to the development of biologic drugs to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a debilitating, progressive lung ...

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Macrophage

Macrophages (Greek: big eaters, from makros "large" + phagein "eat"; abbr. ) are white blood cells within tissues, produced by the division of monocytes. Human macrophages are about 21 micrometres in diameter. Monocytes and macrophages are phagocytes, acting in both non-specific defense (or innate immunity) as well as to help initiate specific defense mechanisms (or adaptive immunity) of vertebrate animals. Their role is to phagocytose (engulf and then digest) cellular debris and pathogens either as stationary or as mobile cells, and to stimulate lymphocytes and other immune cells to respond to the pathogen. They can be identified by specific expression of a number of proteins including CD14, CD11b, F4/80 (mice)/EMR1 (human), Lysozyme M, MAC-1/MAC-3 and CD68 by flow cytometry or immunohistochemical staining. They move by action of Amoeboid movement.

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