Oncology & Cancer

Researchers describe a new resistance mechanism

Researchers at the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL) and the ProCure Program of the Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO) published today inCancer Research a study describing a new mechanism in cancer that turns ...

Medical research

Target found to arrest cancer growth

Adelaide researchers are homing in on a new treatment target for the aggressive blood cancer multiple myeloma.

Oncology & Cancer

Scientists track brain tumor turncoats with advanced imaging

Glioblastomas, the deadliest type of brain tumor in adults, attract "turncoats." These are macrophages, a type of immune cell, which promote tumor progression and mask tumors from the immune system's scrutiny. To better understand ...

Immunology

How bacteria kill host cells from the inside

A bacterial pathogen that typically multiplies outside of host cells can enter and induce the destruction of cells called macrophages, according to a study published June 20 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Anne-BĂ©atrice ...

Inflammatory disorders

Research highlights possible targets to help tackle Crohn's disease

Affecting around 115,000 people in the UK alone, Crohn's Disease is a lifelong condition which sees parts of the digestive system become inflamed. There is no precise cure and causes are believed to vary. But one indicator ...

Medical research

Keeping bone in its place

Heterotopic ossification (HO) is the formation of bone within soft tissue such as muscle, leading to pain and potentially the inability to use a limb. Once thought to be primarily a genetic disease, the cause of most trauma-induced ...

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Macrophage

Macrophages (Greek: big eaters, from makros "large" + phagein "eat"; abbr. ) are white blood cells within tissues, produced by the division of monocytes. Human macrophages are about 21 micrometres in diameter. Monocytes and macrophages are phagocytes, acting in both non-specific defense (or innate immunity) as well as to help initiate specific defense mechanisms (or adaptive immunity) of vertebrate animals. Their role is to phagocytose (engulf and then digest) cellular debris and pathogens either as stationary or as mobile cells, and to stimulate lymphocytes and other immune cells to respond to the pathogen. They can be identified by specific expression of a number of proteins including CD14, CD11b, F4/80 (mice)/EMR1 (human), Lysozyme M, MAC-1/MAC-3 and CD68 by flow cytometry or immunohistochemical staining. They move by action of Amoeboid movement.

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