Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

New study probes macrophages' role in developing pulmonary fibrosis

Scientists have long known that white blood cells called macrophages accumulate in the lungs of people suffering from pulmonary fibrosis. What role macrophages play in developing the often fatal lung disease is less clear.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Zinc discovery holds promise for people with cystic fibrosis

University of Queensland researchers have identified an opportunity to reduce infections in people living with cystic fibrosis (CF). Professor Matt Sweet, Dr. Kaustav Das Gupta and Dr. James Curson from UQ's Institute for ...

Neuroscience

Using the body's own cells to treat traumatic brain injury

Scientists have created a new treatment for traumatic brain injury (TBI) that shrank brain lesions by 56% and significantly reduced local inflammation levels in pigs. The new approach leverages macrophages, a type of white ...

page 1 from 40

Macrophage

Macrophages (Greek: big eaters, from makros "large" + phagein "eat"; abbr. ) are white blood cells within tissues, produced by the division of monocytes. Human macrophages are about 21 micrometres in diameter. Monocytes and macrophages are phagocytes, acting in both non-specific defense (or innate immunity) as well as to help initiate specific defense mechanisms (or adaptive immunity) of vertebrate animals. Their role is to phagocytose (engulf and then digest) cellular debris and pathogens either as stationary or as mobile cells, and to stimulate lymphocytes and other immune cells to respond to the pathogen. They can be identified by specific expression of a number of proteins including CD14, CD11b, F4/80 (mice)/EMR1 (human), Lysozyme M, MAC-1/MAC-3 and CD68 by flow cytometry or immunohistochemical staining. They move by action of Amoeboid movement.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA