Neuroscience

How the brain perceives time

What happens in the brain when listening to the rhythmic pace of a song, or when waiting for a traffic light to turn green? For the first time, an imaging study shows that a time map exists in a specific area of the human ...

Sports Medicine & Kinesiology

Girls need more positive experiences of ball skills

Children's positive perception of movement is an important supporter for natural physical activity and developing motor skills. A study at the University of Jyväskylä suggests that children had high perceptions of motor ...

Neuroscience

How attention helps the brain perceive an object

It's easy to miss something you're not looking for. In a famous example, people were asked to closely observe two groups of people—one group clad in black, the other in white—pass a ball among themselves. Viewers were ...

Genetics

With single gene insertion, blind mice regain sight

It was surprisingly simple. University of California, Berkeley, scientists inserted a gene for a green-light receptor into the eyes of blind mice and, a month later, they were navigating around obstacles as easily as mice ...

Neuroscience

Study shows vision is not always the cause for learning disorders

Learning difficulties in schoolchildren are not always associated with visual problems, since they may be neurobiological or derived from other alterations such as dyslexia or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). ...

Neuroscience

How brains distinguish between self-touch and touch by others

The brain seems to reduce sensory perception from an area of skin when we touch it ourselves, according to a new study from Linköping University published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The ...

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Perception

In philosophy, psychology, and the cognitive sciences, perception is the process of attaining awareness or understanding of sensory information. It is a task far more complex than was imagined in the 1950s and 1960s, when it was predicted that building perceiving machines would take about a decade, a goal which is still very far from fruition. The word comes from the Latin words perceptio, percipio, and means "receiving, collecting, action of taking possession, apprehension with the mind or senses."

Perception is one of the oldest fields in psychology. The oldest quantitative law in psychology is the Weber-Fechner law, which quantifies the relationship between the intensity of physical stimuli and their perceptual effects. The study of perception gave rise to the Gestalt school of psychology, with its emphasis on holistic approach.

What one perceives is a result of interplays between past experiences, including one’s culture, and the interpretation of the perceived. If the percept does not have support in any of these perceptual bases it is unlikely to rise above perceptual threshold.

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