Cardiology

How the body regulates scar tissue growth after heart attacks

New UCLA research conducted in mice could explain why some people suffer more extensive scarring than others after a heart attack. The study, published in the journal Cell, reveals that a protein known as type 5 collagen ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Superbug impact on the gut

Monash University researchers have discovered that the devastating bacterial superbug Clostridioides difficile hijacks the human wound healing system in order to cause serious and persistent disease, opening up the development ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Liver fibrosis 'off switch' discovered in mice

Chronic alcohol abuse and hepatitis can injure the liver, often leading to a buildup of collagen and scar tissue. Understanding this process, known as liver fibrosis, could help researchers develop new ways to prevent or ...

Medications

Anti-hepatitis medicine surprises

Hepatitis C is a serious disease, but the biggest threat to someone's health is not the virus itself. Rather, it is the diseases that can result from it such as reduced liver functioning, scar tissue in the liver and potentially ...

Medical research

Tendon stem cells could revolutionize injury recovery

The buildup of scar tissue makes recovery from torn rotator cuffs, jumper's knee, and other tendon injuries a painful, challenging process, often leading to secondary tendon ruptures. New research led by Carnegie's Chen-Ming ...

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Scar Tissue

"Scar Tissue" is the first single from the American alternative rock band Red Hot Chili Peppers' seventh studio album Californication, released in 1999. It is one of their most successful songs, spending a then-record 16 weeks on top of the Billboard Hot Modern Rock Tracks chart. It peaked at #9 on the Billboard Hot 100. In the UK, the song reached #15 on the UK Singles Chart. It won a Grammy Award for Best Rock Song in 2000. The song is notable for its mellow intro guitar riff and for its slide guitar solos throughout.

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