Neuroscience

Mona Lisa's smile not genuine, researchers believe

New research has found that the Mona Lisa's famed smile is almost certainly 'forced'—raising the intriguing possibility that Leonardo deliberately portrayed her that way.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Whites struggle to tell real from fake smiles on black faces

White people and non-black minorities have a harder time telling the difference between genuine and fake smiles on black faces than they do on white faces, a problem black people don't have, according to research published ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

How many types of smile are there?

In the mid 19th century, French neurologist Guillaume Duchenne wanted to distinguish real smiles from fake. Interested in the response of nerves and muscles to stimulation, he applied electricity to particular parts of faces ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

More than lip service to a smile in advertising and marketing

Brands spend millions of dollars endorsing celebrities, including sports and movie stars, and when they get it right, it can be a powerful marketing tool – think Michael Jordan and Nike, George Clooney and Nespresso, or ...

Surgery

Surgeons transform static 'Mona Lisa' smiles to joyous ones

By modifying a muscle transplant operation, Johns Hopkins surgeons report they are able to restore authentic facial expressions of joy—wide and even smiles—to selected patients with one-sided facial muscle paralysis due ...

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