Psychology & Psychiatry

How many types of smile are there?

In the mid 19th century, French neurologist Guillaume Duchenne wanted to distinguish real smiles from fake. Interested in the response of nerves and muscles to stimulation, he applied electricity to particular parts of faces ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

More than lip service to a smile in advertising and marketing

Brands spend millions of dollars endorsing celebrities, including sports and movie stars, and when they get it right, it can be a powerful marketing tool – think Michael Jordan and Nike, George Clooney and Nespresso, or ...

Surgery

Surgeons transform static 'Mona Lisa' smiles to joyous ones

By modifying a muscle transplant operation, Johns Hopkins surgeons report they are able to restore authentic facial expressions of joy—wide and even smiles—to selected patients with one-sided facial muscle paralysis due ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Certain smiles aren't all they're cracked up to be

Sweaty palms, a racing heart, a faltering voice. Many people find public speaking unpleasant. The mere anticipation of social evaluation increases the activity of almost all body systems related to stress, with particularly ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Happy faces really are healthy faces

For thousands of years, we have been obsessed with having a healthy and attractive facial appearance – by any means necessary. The Egyptians crafted eyeliner from kohl, containing lead (definitely not good for you), and ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Facial models suggest less may be more for a successful smile

Research using computer-animated 3D faces suggests that less is more for a successful smile, according to a study published June 28, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Nathaniel Helwig from the University of Minnesota, ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Your smile gives you away

Smile and the whole world smiles with you? Well, not necessarily.

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