Psychology & Psychiatry

Your smile gives you away

Smile and the whole world smiles with you? Well, not necessarily.

Psychology & Psychiatry

All it takes is a smile (for some guys)

Does she or doesn't she...? Sexual cues are ambiguous, and confounding. We—especially men—often read them wrong. A new study hypothesizes that the men who get it wrong might be the ones that evolution has favored. ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Breaking rules makes you seem powerful

When people have power, they act the part. Powerful people smile less, interrupt others, and speak in a louder voice. When people do not respect the basic rules of social behavior, they lead others to believe that they have ...

Neuroscience

Mona Lisa's smile not genuine, researchers believe

New research has found that the Mona Lisa's famed smile is almost certainly 'forced'—raising the intriguing possibility that Leonardo deliberately portrayed her that way.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Is the human brain capable of identifying a fake smile?

Human beings follows others' state of mind From their facial expressions. "Fear, anger, sadness, and surprise are quickly displeasure inferred in this way," David Beltran Guerrero, researcher at the University of La Laguna, ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Group finds facial expressions not as universal as thought

(Medical Xpress) -- For most of history, people have assumed that facial expressions are generally universal; a smile by someone of any cultural group generally is an expression of happiness or pleasure, for example. This ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Smiling can trick your mind into being more positive, study finds

From Sinatra to Katy Perry, celebrities have long sung about the power of a smile—how it picks you up, changes your outlook, and generally makes you feel better. But is it all smoke and mirrors, or is there a scientific ...

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