Medical research

Endocannabinoid system may be involved in human testis physiology

The endocannabinoid system (ECS) may be directly involved in the regulation of the physiology of the human testis, including the development of sperm cells, according to a study in tissue samples from 15 patients published ...

Medical research

Identification of all types of germ cells tumors

Germ cell tumors constitute a diverse group of rare tumors, which occur in the testes, ovaries and also in other places. Some germ cell tumors exist prenatally, while others present during or after puberty. The majority are ...

Obstetrics & gynaecology

Paternal age over 51 years reduces success rate in IVF and ICSI

While female fertility comes to an irrevocable end with the menopause (at a consistently average age of 51 years), men are not constrained by similar biological senescence. Studies have shown that sperm counts may decline ...

Health

New test measures men's fertility

At a time when more than half of male infertility cannot be explained by current methods, a new test developed by Androvia LifeSciences is able to measure male fertility. The proprietary Cap-Score Male Fertility Assay is ...

Health

Nuts may boost male fertility: study

Eating nuts "significantly" boosted the number and health of sperm in young men in a scientific trial, researchers said Wednesday.

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Spermatozoon

A sperm, from the ancient Greek word σπέρμα (seed) and ζῷον (living being) and more commonly known as a sperm cell, is the haploid cell that is the male gamete. It joins an ovum to form a zygote. A zygote is a single cell, with a complete set of chromosomes, that normally develops into an embryo.

Sperm cells contribute half of the genetic information to the diploid offspring. In mammals, the sex of the offspring is determined by the sperm cell: a spermatozoon bearing a Y chromosome will lead to a male (XY) offspring, while one bearing an X chromosome will lead to a female (XX) offspring (the ovum always provides an X chromosome). Sperm cells were first observed by Anton van Leeuwenhoek in 1677.

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