Health

Nuts may boost male fertility: study

Eating nuts "significantly" boosted the number and health of sperm in young men in a scientific trial, researchers said Wednesday.

Genetics

Sperm carries information about dad's weight

Turns out dads are also eating for two. A study published December 3 in Cell Metabolism reveals that a man's weight affects the heritable information contained in sperm. The sperm cells of lean and obese men possess different ...

Medical research

Walnuts may support sperm health, according to new animal research

New animal research suggests eating a walnut-enriched diet may improve sperm quality by reducing lipid peroxidation, a process that can damage sperm cells. This form of cell damage harms sperm membranes, which are primarily ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

COVID-19 infection may reduce fertility in men

COVID-19 may negatively affect sperm quality and reduce fertility in men, according to research published in Reproduction. The study indicates that COVID-19 infection can cause increased sperm cell death, inflammation, and ...

Health

Male birth control gel to go into trials

A team at the US National Institute of Child Health and Human Development has announced that it will be putting a contraception gel it has developed into trials starting this April. The trials will involve more than 400 couples ...

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Spermatozoon

A sperm, from the ancient Greek word σπέρμα (seed) and ζῷον (living being) and more commonly known as a sperm cell, is the haploid cell that is the male gamete. It joins an ovum to form a zygote. A zygote is a single cell, with a complete set of chromosomes, that normally develops into an embryo.

Sperm cells contribute half of the genetic information to the diploid offspring. In mammals, the sex of the offspring is determined by the sperm cell: a spermatozoon bearing a Y chromosome will lead to a male (XY) offspring, while one bearing an X chromosome will lead to a female (XX) offspring (the ovum always provides an X chromosome). Sperm cells were first observed by Anton van Leeuwenhoek in 1677.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA