Cardiology

Improving cardiovascular health of the most vulnerable

Starting in 2016, a two-year partnership between the North Carolina Chapter of the American College of Cardiology (NCACC) and the North Carolina Association of Free and Charitable Clinics (NCAFCC) provided free lipid lowering ...

Oncology & Cancer

Statins may do double duty on heart disease and cancer

About 40 million adults in the U.S. take a statin to lower their cholesterol and reduce the risk for heart disease. They might also be getting an added anti-cancer benefit, a growing body of evidence suggests.

Cardiology

Risk for skin infections, diabetes increase with statin use

(HealthDay)—Using statins for as short a time as three months can put patients at risk for developing diabetes and skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs), according to a study published in the November issue of the British ...

page 1 from 23

Statin

The statins (or HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors) are a class of drugs that lower cholesterol levels in people with or at risk of cardiovascular disease.

They lower cholesterol by inhibiting the enzyme HMG-CoA reductase, which is the rate-limiting enzyme of the mevalonate pathway of cholesterol synthesis. Inhibition of this enzyme in the liver results in decreased cholesterol synthesis as well as increased synthesis of LDL receptors, resulting in an increased clearance of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) from the bloodstream. The first results can be seen after one week of use and the effect is maximal after four to six weeks.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA