Biomedical technology

Sensor solution for checking electrolyte balance

In the human body, electrolytes play a key role in maintaining water balance and distribution of fluids. All charged particles dissolved in the blood interact with each other. If a disturbance to their complex equilibrium ...

Attention deficit disorders

Researchers identify brain markers of ADHD in children

Researchers analyzing the data from MRI exams on nearly 8,000 children have identified biomarkers of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and a possible role for neuroimaging machine learning to help with the diagnosis, ...

Diabetes

New insights into the mechanisms causing diabetes

Researchers led by Osaka University have now identified a mechanism by which a lack of insulin may be reported back to the pancreatic cells that produce insulin, identifying a potential new therapeutic target for diabetes.

Overweight & Obesity

Dig in: Sand serves up a possible cure for obesity

Engineered particles of purified sand could be the next anti-obesity therapy as new research from the University of South Australia shows that porous silica can prevent fats and carbohydrates from being adsorbed in the body.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Novel monoclonal antibody therapy for SARS-CoV-2

An entirely new approach to monoclonal antibody therapy shows that targeting the more genetically stable internal protein of the SARS-CoV-2 virus rather than the surface spike protein can also clear SARS-CoV-2, reports a ...

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Surface

In mathematics, specifically in topology, a surface is a two-dimensional topological manifold. The most familiar examples are those that arise as the boundaries of solid objects in ordinary three-dimensional Euclidean space R3 — for example, the surface of a ball or bagel. On the other hand, there are surfaces which cannot be embedded in three-dimensional Euclidean space without introducing singularities or intersecting itself — these are the unorientable surfaces.

To say that a surface is "two-dimensional" means that, about each point, there is a coordinate patch on which a two-dimensional coordinate system is defined. For example, the surface of the Earth is (ideally) a two-dimensional sphere, and latitude and longitude provide coordinates on it — except at the International Date Line and the poles, where longitude is undefined. This example illustrates that not all surfaces admits a single coordinate patch. In general, multiple coordinate patches are needed to cover a surface.

Surfaces find application in physics, engineering, computer graphics, and many other disciplines, primarily when they represent the surfaces of physical objects. For example, in analyzing the aerodynamic properties of an airplane, the central consideration is the flow of air along its surface.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA