Neuroscience

Why only some post-stroke survivors can 'copy what I say'

In an article in Brain, researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) and elsewhere report which brain regions must be intact in stroke survivors with aphasia if they are to perform well in a speech entrainment ...

Neuroscience

Raw or cooked: This is how we recognise food

Do we see a pear or an apple? The occipital cortex in our brain will activate itself to recognise it. A piece of bread or a nice plate of pasta with sauce? Another region will come into play, called the middle temporal gyrus. ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Recognizing the uniqueness of individuals with schizophrenia

Schizophrenia is an extremely variable psychiatric disorder that is diagnosed based on the presence of specific symptoms. Thomas Wolfers and André Marquand of Radboud university medical center investigated how much the brains ...

Neuroscience

How the brain suppresses the act of revenge

The desire for revenge can be the consequence of a feeling of anger. But is this the case at the cerebral level? What happens in the human brain when injustice is felt? To answer these questions, researchers from the University ...

Neuroscience

Researchers discover new 'GPS' neuron

An international research team led by the University of Amsterdam researchers Jeroen Bos, Martin Vinck and Cyriel Pennartz has identified a new type of neuron which might play a vital role in humans' ability to navigate their ...

Neuroscience

An innovative model for the study of vision

A new study shows for the first time that the progressive processing of the visual signal underlying human object recognition is similarly implemented in the rat brain, thus extending the range of experimental techniques, ...

page 1 from 4