Oncology & Cancer

Immunotherapy to shrink treatment-resistant cancer tumors

Advancements in cancer research and treatment have resulted in great improvements in survival rates—today, there are almost 17 million people in the United States alone who have survived their diagnosis because of the physicians ...

Oncology & Cancer

Dynamic cells linked to brain tumor growth and recurrence

Tumors are made up of many types of cells, both cancerous and benign. The specific complexity of the cells inside brain tumors has been a trademark of the disease, one that makes treatment extremely difficult. While scientists ...

Oncology & Cancer

Study shows why many cancer cells need to import fat

Columbia and MIT researchers are revealing the surprising reasons why cancer cells are often forced to rely on fat imports, a finding that could lead to new ways to understand and slow down tumor growth.

Oncology & Cancer

How tumors make immune cells 'go bad'

Investigators from Cedars-Sinai Cancer have discovered that cancerous tumors called soft-tissue sarcomas produce a protein that switches immune cells from tumor-attacking to tumor-promoting. The study, published today in ...

Oncology & Cancer

New model helps identify mutations that drive cancer

Cancer cells can have thousands of mutations in their DNA. However, only a handful of those actually drive the progression of cancer; the rest are just along for the ride.

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Transforming growth factor

Transforming growth factor (sometimes referred to as Tumor growth factor, or TGF) is used to describe two classes of polypeptide growth factors, TGFα and TGFβ.

The name "Transforming Growth Factor" is somewhat arbitrary, since the two classes of TGFs are not structurally or genetically related to one another, and they act through different receptor mechanisms. Furthermore, they do not always induce cellular transformation, and are not the only growth factors that induce cellular transformation.

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