Psychology & Psychiatry

New research reveals how we make sense of compound words

People process compound words—like snowball—and words that look like compound words but aren't—like carpet—in the same way, according to new University of Alberta research that has broad applications from rehabilitation ...

Neuroscience

How meaning is represented in the human brain

Representations reflecting non-linguistic experience have been detected in brain activity during reading in study of healthy, native English speakers published in JNeurosci. The research brings us one step closer to a more ...

Neuroscience

Neurologist explains why Greta Thunberg is so powerful

Greta Thunberg's speech at the United Nations rattled people around the globe. The 16-year-old accused world leaders of neglecting their duty and foisting the problems created by one generation onto the backs of another—today's ...

Neuroscience

The voice is key to making sense of the words in our brain

Scientists at the Basque research center BCBL conclude that the voice is fundamental for mentally presenting the meaning of words in the brain. This finding implies a greater knowledge about how sound waves bring additional ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

How to recognize early learning challenges in kids

(HealthDay)—Many children have difficulty with learning at some point, but those with learning disabilities often have several specific and persistent signs, which can start in preschool years. Recognizing them as soon ...

Neuroscience

Listeners immerse themselves in audiobooks in very different ways

Researchers at Aalto University analysed how listeners immerse themselves in audiobooks by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and words that the story brings to mind. The study indicated that word lists resembling ...

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Word

A word is the smallest free form (an item that may be uttered in isolation with semantic or pragmatic content) in a language, in contrast to a morpheme, which is the smallest unit of meaning. A word may consist of only one morpheme (e.g. cat), but a single morpheme may not be able to exist as a free form (e.g. the English plural morpheme -s).

Typically, a word will consist of a root or stem, and zero or more affixes. Words can be combined to create other units of language, such as phrases, clauses, and/or sentences. A word consisting of two or more stems joined together form a compound. A word combined with an already existing word or part of a word form a portmanteau.

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