Psychology & Psychiatry

Bilingualism comes naturally to our brains, new study shows

The brain uses a shared mechanism for combining words from a single language and for combining words from two different languages, a team of neuroscientists has discovered. Its findings indicate that language switching is ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Why words become harder to remember as we get older

As we get older, we find it increasingly difficult to have the right words ready at the right moment—even though our vocabulary actually grows continuously over the course of our lives. Until now, it was unclear why this ...

Immunology

Scientists decode the 'language' of immune cells

UCLA life scientists have identified six "words" that specific immune cells use to call up immune defense genes—an important step toward understanding the language the body uses to marshal responses to threats.

Neuroscience

Neuronal recycling: This is how our brain allows us to read

Letters, syllables, words and sentences—these are spatially arranged sets of symbols that acquire meaning when we read them. But is there an area and cognitive mechanism in our brain that is specifically devoted to reading? ...

page 1 from 21

Word

A word is the smallest free form (an item that may be uttered in isolation with semantic or pragmatic content) in a language, in contrast to a morpheme, which is the smallest unit of meaning. A word may consist of only one morpheme (e.g. cat), but a single morpheme may not be able to exist as a free form (e.g. the English plural morpheme -s).

Typically, a word will consist of a root or stem, and zero or more affixes. Words can be combined to create other units of language, such as phrases, clauses, and/or sentences. A word consisting of two or more stems joined together form a compound. A word combined with an already existing word or part of a word form a portmanteau.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA