Psychology & Psychiatry

Study finds out why some words may be more memorable than others

Thousands of words, big and small, are crammed inside our memory banks just waiting to be swiftly withdrawn and strung into sentences. In a recent study of epilepsy patients and healthy volunteers, National Institutes of ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

US developing vaccine against deadly China virus: officials

The United States said Tuesday it was developing a vaccine against a deadly virus that originated in China, and urged Beijing to step up its cooperation with international health authorities.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Brain responses as state markers of depression

Depression has been associated with bias in the processing of emotional information. Studies have for example, shown, that depressed individuals attend to negative stimuli, interpret neutral faces as sad and have enhanced ...

Health

Study: Doctors give electronic health records an 'F'

The transition to electronic health records (EHRs) was supposed to improve the quality and efficiency of healthcare for doctors and patients alike—but these technologies get an "F" rating for usability from health care ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

New research reveals how we make sense of compound words

People process compound words—like snowball—and words that look like compound words but aren't—like carpet—in the same way, according to new University of Alberta research that has broad applications from rehabilitation ...

Neuroscience

How meaning is represented in the human brain

Representations reflecting non-linguistic experience have been detected in brain activity during reading in study of healthy, native English speakers published in JNeurosci. The research brings us one step closer to a more ...

Neuroscience

Neurologist explains why Greta Thunberg is so powerful

Greta Thunberg's speech at the United Nations rattled people around the globe. The 16-year-old accused world leaders of neglecting their duty and foisting the problems created by one generation onto the backs of another—today's ...

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Word

A word is the smallest free form (an item that may be uttered in isolation with semantic or pragmatic content) in a language, in contrast to a morpheme, which is the smallest unit of meaning. A word may consist of only one morpheme (e.g. cat), but a single morpheme may not be able to exist as a free form (e.g. the English plural morpheme -s).

Typically, a word will consist of a root or stem, and zero or more affixes. Words can be combined to create other units of language, such as phrases, clauses, and/or sentences. A word consisting of two or more stems joined together form a compound. A word combined with an already existing word or part of a word form a portmanteau.

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