Glioblastoma

Finding keys to glioblastoma therapeutic resistance

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have found one of the keys to why certain glioblastomas – the primary form of a deadly brain cancer – are resistant to drug therapy. The answer ...

Aug 26, 2014
popularity not rated yet | comments 0

Brain tumour cells found circulating in blood

(Medical Xpress)—German scientists have discovered rogue brain tumour cells in patient blood samples, challenging the idea that this type of cancer doesn't generally spread beyond the brain.

Aug 01, 2014
popularity 4.5 / 5 (6) | comments 1

Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and most aggressive malignant primary brain tumor in humans, involving glial cells and accounting for 52% of all functional tissue brain tumor cases and 20% of all intracranial tumors. Despite being the most prevalent form of primary brain tumor, GBMs occur in only 2–3 cases per 100,000 people in Europe and North America. According to the WHO classification of the tumors of the central nervous system‎, the standard name for this brain tumor is "glioblastoma"; it presents two variants: giant cell glioblastoma and gliosarcoma. Glioblastomas are also an important brain tumor in canines, and research continues to use this as a model for developing treatments in humans.

Treatment can involve chemotherapy, radiation, radiosurgery, corticosteroids, antiangiogenic therapy, surgery and experimental approaches such as gene transfer.

With the exception of the brainstem gliomas, glioblastoma has the worst prognosis of any central nervous system (CNS) malignancy, despite multimodality treatment consisting of open craniotomy with surgical resection of as much of the tumor as possible, followed by concurrent or sequential chemoradiotherapy, antiangiogenic therapy with bevacizumab, gamma knife radiosurgery, and symptomatic management with corticosteroids. Prognosis is poor, with a median survival time of approximately 14 months.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

Latest Spotlight News

Gut bacteria are protected by host during illness

To protect their gut microbes during illness, sick mice produce specialized sugars in the gut that feed their microbiota and maintain a healthy microbial balance. This protective mechanism also appears to help resist or tolerate ...