Skin Cancer

Important advance in the fight against skin cancer

Researchers from the Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute (IMIM), lead by Lluís Espinosa, have identified a new function of the IB protein that is key in the development of squamous-cell carcinoma, a type of skin ...

Jul 11, 2013
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Skin cancer incidence up after pancreas transplantation

(HealthDay)—Nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) commonly occur after pancreas transplantation (PT), particularly in those who have a history of skin cancer, according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal ...

Sep 21, 2012
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East Asian genes may solve the skin cancer puzzle

Europeans fall prey to skin cancer because of their lighter skin, while Africans' dark skin protects them. But East Asians, whose skin colour resembles that of Europeans, are similar to Africans in their low susceptibility ...

Jan 07, 2014
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Targeting PTEN may prevent skin cancer

Scientists believe they have identified a role for PTEN, a known tumor suppressor, in removing DNA damage derived from UVB radiation, a known risk factor for non-melanoma skin cancer, according to a study published in Cancer ...

Jul 26, 2011
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Detecting skin cancer quickly

Melanoma is aggressive and life-threatening. If it is not detected early, the prospects of recovery drop. Screening is complicated, though. Together with several project partners, Fraunhofer researchers have developed an ...

May 04, 2015
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Skin neoplasms (also known as "skin cancer") are skin growths with differing causes and varying degrees of malignancy. The three most common malignant skin cancers are basal cell cancer, squamous cell cancer, and melanoma, each of which is named after the type of skin cell from which it arises. Skin cancer generally develops in the epidermis (the outermost layer of skin), so a tumor can usually be seen. This means that it is often possible to detect skin cancers at an early stage. Unlike many other cancers, including those originating in the lung, pancreas, and stomach, only a small minority of those affected will actually die of the disease, though it can be disfiguring. Melanoma survival rates are poorer than for non-melanoma skin cancer, although when melanoma is diagnosed at an early stage, treatment is easier and more people survive.

Skin cancer is the most commonly diagnosed type of cancer. Melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers combined are more common than lung, breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer. Melanoma is less common than both basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, but it is the most serious — for example, in the UK there were over 11,700 new cases of melanoma in 2008, and over 2,000 deaths. It is the second most common cancer in young adults aged 15–34 in the UK. Most cases are caused by over-exposure to UV rays from the sun or sunbeds. Non-melanoma skin cancers are the most common skin cancers. The majority of these are basal cell carcinomas. These are usually localized growths caused by excessive cumulative exposure to the sun and do not tend to spread.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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