Type 2 Diabetes

New diabetes risk mechanism identified

Researchers at Mayo Clinic have discovered an unexpected effect from a gene known to increase diabetes risk. They assumed that the specific allele in the gene TCF7L2 which increases the risk of type 2 diabetes, impairs insulin ...

Nov 12, 2015
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Three renal biomarkers predict outcome in diabetes

(HealthDay)—Three renal biomarkers, acute kidney injury (AKI), albuminuria, and low estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), considered separately or together, can predict adverse outcomes in diabetes, according to ...

Nov 10, 2015
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Putting exercise under the microscope

According to the Centers for Disease Control, newly diagnosed cases of type 2 diabetes have quadrupled since 1980, when 4.5 million cases were diagnosed, to 20.9 million in 2011.

Nov 11, 2015
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Phone for a doctor

Worried you might be at risk from diabetes? Check your phone: it might help stop you getting the disease. And if you already have diabetes? Your phone might even help you monitor your condition at home.

Oct 29, 2015
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Diabetes mellitus type 2 – formerly non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) or adult-onset diabetes – is a metabolic disorder that is characterized by high blood glucose in the context of insulin resistance and relative insulin deficiency. The classic symptoms are excess thirst, frequently having to urinate, and constant hunger. Type 2 diabetes makes up about 90% of cases of diabetes with the other 10% due primarily to diabetes mellitus type 1 and gestational diabetes. Obesity is the primary cause of type 2 diabetes in people who are genetically predisposed to the disease.

Type 2 diabetes is initially managed by increasing exercise and dietary modification. If blood sugars are not lowered by these measures, medications such as metformin or insulin may be needed. In those on insulin there is typically the requirement to routinely check blood sugar levels.

Rates of diabetes have increased markedly over the last 50 years in parallel with obesity. As of 2010 there are approximately 285 million people with the disease compared to around 30 million in 1985. Long-term complications from high blood sugar can include heart attacks, strokes, diabetic retinopathy where eye sight is affected, kidney failure which may require dialysis, and poor circulation of limbs leading to amputations. The acute complication ketoacidosis is uncommon unlike in type 1 diabetes, nonketonic hyperglycemia however may occur.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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