Fewer mitochondria in offspring of parents with diabetes

Fewer mitochondria in offspring of parents with diabetes
Normal-weight, insulin-resistant individuals whose parents have type 2 diabetes have fewer mitochondria in their muscles due to lower expression of lipoprotein lipase, according to a study published in the April issue of Diabetes.

(HealthDay) -- Normal-weight, insulin-resistant individuals whose parents have type 2 diabetes have fewer mitochondria in their muscles due to lower expression of lipoprotein lipase (LPL), according to a study published in the April issue of Diabetes.

Katsutaro Morino, from the Yale University School of Medicine in New Haven, Conn., and colleagues examined gene expression and their potential involvement in regulating mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle from 11 young, lean, insulin-resistant offspring of parents with type 2 diabetes and 11 insulin-sensitive subjects without a family history of type 2 diabetes.

The researchers found that the insulin-resistant subjects had significantly lower and of LPL in skeletal muscle, which was associated with reduced mitochondrial density. deficient in LPL had lower mitochondrial content due to reduced fatty acid delivery and reduced activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-δ (PPAR-δ).

"Taken together, these data suggest that decreased mitochondrial content in muscle of insulin-resistant offspring may be due in part to reductions in LPL expression in skeletal muscle resulting in decreased PPAR-δ activation," Morino and colleagues conclude.

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Power-boosting signal in muscle declines with age

Feb 06, 2007

As people age, they may have to exercise even harder to get the benefits afforded to younger folk. That's the suggestion of a report in the February issue of the journal Cell Metabolism, published by Cell Press, showing that a ...

Exercise pivotal in preventing and fighting type II diabetes

Feb 07, 2007

One in three American children born in 2000 will develop type II diabetes, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). A new study at the University of Missouri-Columbia says that acute exercise ...

Recommended for you

Screening for diabetes at dental visits using oral blood

Feb 26, 2015

It is estimated that 8.1 million of the 29.1 million Americans living with diabetes are undiagnosed and many who have diabetes have poor glycemic control. Given that each year many Americans visit a dental provider but not ...

CBT, sertraline insufficient in diabetes and depression

Feb 26, 2015

(HealthDay)—For patients with diabetes and depression, improvements in depression are seen with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) or sertraline, with a significant advantage for sertraline, but glycemic ...

Early signs in young children predict type 1 diabetes

Feb 26, 2015

New research shows that it is possible to predict the development of type 1 diabetes. By measuring the presence of autoantibodies in the blood, it is possible to detect whether the immune system has begun to break down the ...

Daily menu plan reduces blood sugar significantly

Feb 25, 2015

A large group of people with diabetes who followed a menu plan created by University of Alberta nutrition researchers for just three months significantly reduced their blood sugar levels.

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.