Tonsil and adenoid removal reduces asthma symptoms in children

Children with asthma who have their tonsils and adenoids (T&A) removed may experience fewer asthma symptoms.

Researchers from Children's Hospital and Research Center in Oakland, California, followed 105 children with asthma (7-21 years) referred for sleep study for suspected sleep apnea.

Twenty-four patients with apnea required T&A, of which 11 patients followed through with surgery.

Results indicated that scores trended toward improvement with T&A. However, there was no significant increase in the lung function following T&A.

This study was presented during CHEST 2012, the annual meeting of the American College of Chest Physicians, held October 20 – 25, in Atlanta, Georgia.

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