Pain management varies among palliative care centers

Pain management varies among palliative care centers
The management of pain outcomes for terminally ill cancer patients varies widely between inpatient palliative care centers and is affected by organizational factors such as human resources adequacy, according to a study published in the Nov. 15 issue of Cancer.

(HealthDay)—The management of pain outcomes for terminally ill cancer patients varies widely between inpatient palliative care centers and is affected by organizational factors such as human resources adequacy, according to a study published in the Nov. 15 issue of Cancer.

In an effort to determine whether outcomes vary between centers, Dong Wook Shin, M.D., Dr.P.H., M.B.A., of the Seoul National University Hospital in South Korea, and colleagues conducted a study involving 1,711 patients with terminal cancer receiving care at 34 inpatient palliative care centers.

One week after admission the researchers found that 82.8 percent of patients had achieved adequate pain control, with a mean reduction of 0.69 to 1.91 points on pain scale scores. Pain management outcomes varied widely between palliative care centers. Human resource adequacy, in particular, correlated significantly with a greater reduction in and an achievement of adequate pain control.

"From the and research perspectives, we believe that more research is needed to identify organizational factors that affect pain management outcomes," the authors write. "Measures should be taken to reduce organizational factors that are associated with inadequate pain management."

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Study: Patients often don't report pain

Feb 13, 2006

A Rochester, Minn., study finds more than 20 percent of people with chronic pain don't seek medical help, suggesting many have unmet pain care needs.

Systematic pain management needed for children in ER

Oct 29, 2012

(HealthDay)—Steps to manage pain and stress in pediatric emergency medical care are recommended, according to a clinical report from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published online Oct. 29 in ...

Recommended for you

Pepper and halt: Spicy chemical may inhibit gut tumors

6 hours ago

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that dietary capsaicin – the active ingredient in chili peppers – produces chronic activation of a receptor on cells lining ...

Expressive writing may help breast cancer survivors

7 hours ago

Writing down fears, emotions and the benefits of a cancer diagnosis may improve health outcomes for Asian-American breast cancer survivors, according to a study conducted by a researcher at the University of Houston (UH).

Taking the guesswork out of cancer therapy

13 hours ago

Researchers and doctors at the Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (IBN), Singapore General Hospital (SGH) and National Cancer Centre Singapore (NCCS) have co-developed the first molecular test ...

Brain tumour cells found circulating in blood

14 hours ago

(Medical Xpress)—German scientists have discovered rogue brain tumour cells in patient blood samples, challenging the idea that this type of cancer doesn't generally spread beyond the brain.

International charge on new radiation treatment for cancer

15 hours ago

(Medical Xpress)—Imagine a targeted radiation therapy for cancer that could pinpoint and blast away tumors more effectively than traditional methods, with fewer side effects and less damage to surrounding tissues and organs.

User comments