Single vaginal delivery ups later risk of pelvic organ prolapse

Single vaginal delivery ups later risk of pelvic organ prolapse
Twenty years after childbirth, the risk of symptomatic pelvic organ prolapse is increased after a single vaginal delivery versus cesarean section, according to a study published online Nov. 2 in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

(HealthDay)—Twenty years after childbirth, the risk of symptomatic pelvic organ prolapse (sPOP) is increased after a single vaginal delivery versus cesarean section, according to a study published online Nov. 2 in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

Maria Gyhagen, from the Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University in Sweden, and colleagues examined the prevalence and risk factors for sPOP and concomitant urinary incontinence 20 years after one cesarean section or vaginal delivery. A total of 5,236 singleton primiparae with a birth in 1985 to 1988 with no further births were surveyed using validated questionnaires.

The researchers found that there was an increased prevalence of sPOP after vaginal delivery compared with cesarean section (14.6 versus 6.3 percent; odds ratio, 2.55). No increase was seen after acute versus elective cesarean section. Compared with spontaneous vaginal delivery there was no increased risk of sPOP with episiotomy, vacuum extraction, and second-degree or more laceration. With each unit increase of current and each 100 g increase in , there was a significant 3 percent increase in sPOP. The prevalence of sPOP was doubled for mothers ≤160 cm in height who delivered a child weighing 4,000 g or greater, compared with short mothers who delivered an infant weighing less than 4,000 g (24.2 versus 13.4 percent; odds ratio, 2.06). Compared with women without prolapse, women with sPOP more often had urinary incontinence and urinary incontinence for more than 10 years.

"The prevalence of sPOP was doubled after vaginal delivery compared with , two decades after one birth," the authors write.

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

OASIS risk up for nulliparous women with vacuum delivery

date Aug 24, 2012

(HealthDay)—For women whose infants are delivered by vacuum extraction, the risk of obstetric anal sphincter injury (OASIS) is significantly higher among nulliparous women than multiparous women, according ...

Reduced baby risk from another cesarean

date Mar 13, 2012

A major study led by the University of Adelaide has found that women who have had one prior cesarean can lower the risk of death and serious complications for their next baby - and themselves - by electing to have another ...

Fear of childbirth increases likelihood of C-section

date Sep 21, 2011

A new study published in the international journal Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica (AOGS) reveals that fear of childbirth is a predisposing factor for emergency and elective cesarean sections, even after psycho ...

Recommended for you

Rotational instrument delivery OK for fetal malposition

date Mar 24, 2015

(HealthDay)—Neonatal outcomes are no worse with rotational instrumental delivery than with cesarean delivery for persistent fetal malposition, according to a study published in the March issue of the American Jo ...

Shoulder dystocia maneuvers not tied to neonatal harm

date Mar 23, 2015

(HealthDay)—A variety of shoulder dystocia maneuvers are not associated with neonatal morbidity after adjusting for duration, according to a study published in the March issue of the American Journal of ...

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.