Morbid obesity in women on the rise, study finds

April 4, 2013

(Medical Xpress)—A Deakin University study has found that the rate of morbid obesity in women increased by almost 70 per cent over a 10 year period.

Researchers with Deakin's School of Medicine monitored the height and weight of 1,494 in 1993-1997 and 1,076 in 2004-2008 to determine any shift in (BMI). They found the average BMI increased from 26 to 27.1, while the rate of morbid obesity rose from 2.5 per cent to 4.2 per cent of the women in the study.

With obesity continuing to be one of the biggest facing , Deakin's Associate Professor Julie Pasco said it was important that we monitor not only the growing rates of obesity generally, but also keep a close eye on the rates of morbid obesity.

"We tend to monitor obesity based on the proportion of the population whose BMI exceeds 30. What this fails to measure is the number of people who are morbidly obese, that is those whose BMI in greater than 40," Associate Professor Pasco explained.

"It is important that we monitor the growing number of people who are morbidly obese as the adverse amplify as the level of obesity increases.

"Obesity-related exceeded $8billion in 2008 and we are seeing service providers increasingly having to invest in equipment designed to accommodate the . It is therefore not unreasonable to expect that with rates of morbid obesity on the rise, the direct and indirect costs will also increase."

For this study the researchers set out to determine how the prevalence of morbid obesity, as indicated by a BMI greater than 40, had changed over a decade among women living in south-eastern Australia.

The study looked at the BMI of women involved in the Geelong Osteoporosis Study (see more about this study below), during two time periods, ten years apart. Height and weight measurements for 1,494 women (aged 20—94 years) during 1993—1997 and for 1, 076 women (aged 20—93 years) during 2004—2008, to see if there had been any changes in BMI.

The researchers found that average BMI increased from 26 in 1993-7 to 27.1 in 2004-8. The prevalence of morbid obesity increased from 2.5 per cent to 4.2 per cent of the women in the study. The increase in BMI and prevalence of morbid obesity were seen for all ages and across the socioeconomic spectrum.

"The results of our study highlight the growing problem of morbid obesity," Associate Professor Pasco said.

"The challenge continues to be to identify and implement effective strategies for the whole community that will shift the scales in the direction of lowering the rates of obesity and most particularly ."

The results of this study are published online in the journal BMC Public Health.

Explore further: Obesity and depression independently increase health costs

More information: www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2458/13/290/abstract

Related Stories

Obesity and depression independently increase health costs

October 31, 2011

Obesity and depression both dramatically increase health care costs, but they mainly act separately, according to a study published in the November 2011 Journal of General Internal Medicine by Group Health Research Institute ...

Researchers discover that obesity hinders kidney donation

May 10, 2012

Researchers at the Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine and Feinstein Institute for Medical Research conducted a retrospective analysis which found that morbid obesity impedes kidney donation. In fact, in the analysis ...

Prevalence of gout increases with increasing BMI

July 17, 2012

(HealthDay) -- Having an increased body mass index (BMI) correlates with increased prevalence of gout in adults, according to study published online July 6 in Arthritis Care & Research.

Recommended for you

A metabolic master switch underlying human obesity

August 19, 2015

Obesity is one of the biggest public health challenges of the 21st century. Affecting more than 500 million people worldwide, obesity costs at least $200 billion each year in the United States alone, and contributes to potentially ...

Scientists probe obesity's ties to breast cancer risk

August 20, 2015

Obesity is a well-known risk factor for breast cancer, but researchers haven't figured out what connects the two. A new study suggests the link may be due to a change in breast tissue structure, which might promote breast ...

Can a new drug brown the fat and trim the obese person?

May 28, 2015

New research has found that a variant of a drug used to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension prompts weight loss in obese mice. Among mice fed a high-fat diet, those who did not get the medication became obese while medicated ...

Changing stem cell structure may help fight obesity

February 17, 2015

The research, conducted at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL), found that a slight regulation in the length of primary cilia, small hair-like projections found on most cells, prevented the production of fat cells from ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.