Remote training feasible, effective for surgical skills

Remote training feasible, effective for surgical skills
Remote teaching of surgical skills is feasible and effective in low-resource areas, according to a study published in the July issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

(HealthDay)—Remote teaching of surgical skills is feasible and effective in low-resource areas, according to a study published in the July issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

To examine the feasibility of using video Internet communication to teach and evaluate , Amy M. Autry, M.D., from the University of California in San Francisco, and colleagues randomized intern physicians rotating in the Obstetrics and Gynecology Department at a university hospital in Uganda to usual practice (controls; seven ) or to receive three video teaching sessions with the University of California, San Francisco faculty (; eight interns). A small video camera was used to make preintervention and postintervention videos of all interns tying knots.

The researchers found that there was a 50 percent or greater score improvement in six of eight interns in the intervention group, compared with one of seven in the (75 versus 14 percent; P = 0.04). Scores decreased for 71 percent of in the control group (five of seven) and in none of the intervention participants. Attendings, colleagues, and the Internet were used as sources for learning about knot-tying by participants in both groups. Knot-tying was less likely to be practiced in the control group versus the intervention group. This method of training was enjoyable and helpful for both trainees and the instructors.

"Remote teaching in low-resource settings, where faculty time is limited and access to visiting faculty is sporadic, is feasible, effective, and well-accepted by both learner and teacher," the authors write.

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Simulator-based robotic sx curriculum hones skills

May 13, 2013

(HealthDay)—A simulator-based curriculum incorporating fundamental skills of robotic surgery (FSRS) is feasible and improves effectiveness in basic robotic surgery skills, according to a study published ...

Recommended for you

User comments