Exercise programs could help to prevent fall injuries in older people

Exercise programmes designed to prevent falls in older adults also appear to prevent injuries caused by falls, suggests a paper published today in BMJ.

Fall-related injuries are very common among older people and are a major cause of long-term pain and . They also increase the risk of discharge to a nursing home and have a high economic cost.

Well-designed exercise programmes can prevent in living at home. However, evidence to date that these programmes can prevent injuries caused by falls is poor.

Researchers from France therefore looked to see whether exercise programmes are associated with a significantly lower risk of and other injuries due to falls. The main aim of the paper was to review the current evidence about the effect of exercise interventions on different outcomes of injurious falls.

Data were taken from the Cochrane Library, Pubmed, EMBASE and CINAHIL through June 2013. The review included 17 trials with a total of 2195 participants in the and 2110 in the control groups. The mean age was 76 years and 77% were women.

Tai Chi was the exercise in two of the trials but the rest consisted of gait, balance and functional training (exercise which involves training for activities performed in daily life). Most trials also included strength / resistance training exercises.

The review revealed substantial variations in the definition and classification of injurious falls and most trials did not provide a reference for their definition. Injurious falls usually included very diverse consequences ranging from relatively minor injuries such as bruises to fractures and other serious injuries requiring hospitalisations. Four injurious falls categories were therefore distinguished for this review, based on severity or medical care.

Most of the exercise interventions tended to reduce injurious falls in all categories. Exercise seemed to significantly decrease the rate of falls resulting in medical care, serious injuries and fractures.

This review provides evidence that fall prevention exercise programmes for older people not only reduce fall rates but also prevent injuries resulting from falls in older community-dwelling individuals. The researchers say this effect appears most pronounced for the most severe fall-related injuries.

All the exercises that proved to be effective for fall prevention emphasised balance training which the researchers say is "ample evidence that this type of programme improves balance ability". They also add that this may be down to "improving cognitive functioning".

The researchers say that this review, the first of its kind, suggests that "reducing the risk of falling and improving protective responses during a fall may be an important and feasible means of preventing fractures and other serious injuries in the elderly". They add this finding is especially important as most fractures in the population occur in at moderate "bone risk" for their age and that "additional effective strategies that can be proposed to larger segments of the elderly population will be necessary to reduce the burden of fractures".

In conclusion, the researchers say that the results show a "positive effect of exercise on injurious falls, including the most severe falls". They add that the results provide useful additional evidence for health care providers to encourage patients to take part in fall-prevention programmes. They suggest that future trials should aim to address some of the limitations by providing data on other important outcomes, such as the quality of life.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Falls don't have to be part of getting older, experts argue

Sep 27, 2013

Falls are the leading cause of fatal injuries among older people, but experts from The University of Manchester argue they should not just be written off as an unavoidable consequence of ageing. According to the researchers ...

Exercise reduces falls in older people

Apr 15, 2009

Exercise programmes are an effective option for preventing falls among older people living in the community. There is less evidence at present for the effectiveness of other interventions, such as home safety improvements ...

Recommended for you

Tracking spending among the commercially insured

2 hours ago

Recent growth in health care spending for commercially insured individuals is due primarily to increases in prices for medical services, rather than increased use, according to a new study led by researchers at The Dartmouth ...

Taking aim at added sugars to improve Americans' health

6 hours ago

Now that health advocates' campaigns against trans-fats have largely succeeded in sidelining the use of the additive, they're taking aim at sugar for its potential contributions to Americans' health conditions. But scientists ...

User comments