Hitting inflammation in the guts

Infiltrating fibroblasts (green) in a model of inflammatory bowel disease

Researchers in UCD Conway Institute and Systems Biology Ireland have identified a way that a new class of anti-inflammatory drugs may be used to treat inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

IBD describes a group of commonly occurring and severe diseases including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Treatment options for the hallmark symptom of chronically inflamed intestinal tissues are limited, often ultimately requiring surgical removal of inflamed tissue.

A research team led by Professor Cormac Taylor, UCD Conway Institute, have previously shown that a class of drugs called hydroxylase inhibitors may provide a new approach to the treatment of IBD. This study now outlines how this occurs at the molecular level.

Hypoxia is a key microenvironmental feature of inflamed tissues that strongly impacts on the inflammatory processes. A family of oxygen-sensing enzymes called HIF-hydroxylases are responsible for controlling the cellular adaptive response to hypoxia.

This new study, led by Prof Cormac Taylor, Dr Eoin Cummins and Dr Carsten Scholz and published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, show that hydroxylase inhibitors work by blocking a pro-inflammatory pathway termed the IL-1 pathway; a key driver of inflammation.

These results give significant new information as to a new level of crosstalk between hypoxia and inflammation and provide a mechanism to explain how this new approach to the control of inflammation may work.

Outlining the results, Dr Eoin Cummins said, "We demonstrate that pharmacologic hydroxylase inhibition down-regulates IL-1b-induced pro-inflammatory NF-kB activity both in vitro and in vivo. Two distinct hydroxylase isoforms, PHD1 and FIH, are acting together to achieve this inhibitory effect, which occurs downstream of TRAF6 activation.

A number of key proteins in the proximal IL-1b signalling pathway were found to interact with PHD1 and FIH and/or be subject to hydroxylation. Based on this data, we hypothesise a key role for hydroxylation as a new post-transcriptional modification in the IL-1b pathway."

"This research stems from studies in our laboratory over the last decade into how cells respond to decreased . We found that cells can adapt to low oxygen levels much like mountain climbers adapt to low oxygen levels at altitude. If we use drugs to mimic this adaptive response in inflammation, it suppresses the inflammatory response" says Professor Taylor.

More information: Regulation of IL-1β–induced NF-κB by hydroxylases links key hypoxic and inflammatory signaling pathways. Carsten C. Scholz, Miguel A. S. Cavadas, Murtaza M. Tambuwala, Emily Hams, Javier Rodríguez, Alex von Kriegsheim, Philip Cotter, Ulrike Bruning, Padraic G. Fallon, Alex Cheong, Eoin P. Cummins, and Cormac T. Taylor. PNAS 2013 ; published ahead of print October 21, 2013, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1309718110

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

A new 'on' signal for inflammation

May 14, 2013

(Medical Xpress)—Inflammation is an important response in the body - it helps you to kill off invaders such bacteria that could cause a harmful infection. But if it's chronic or uncontrolled, inflammation can also cause ...

Key regulator in inflammatory bowel disease identified

Aug 09, 2010

UCD Conway scientists led by Professor Cormac Taylor have pinpointed a key regulator involved in maintaining the functional integrity of the gut lining as part of their reseach into inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Together ...

Illuminating cross talk between signalling factors

Nov 22, 2011

(Medical Xpress) -- Hypoxia and inflammation are environmental features occuring simultaneously in a variety of diseases such as growing tumours and critically inflamed tissues. UCD scientists investigating the relative contributions ...

Recommended for you

Seabed solution for cold sores

52 minutes ago

The blue blood of abalone, a seabed delicacy could be used to combat common cold sores and related herpes virus following breakthrough research at the University of Sydney.

Better living through mitochondrial derived vesicles

21 hours ago

(Medical Xpress)—As principal transformers of bacteria, organelles, synapses, and cells, vesicles might be said to be the stuff of life. One need look no further than the rapid rise to prominence of The ...

Zebrafish help to unravel Alzheimer's disease

22 hours ago

New fundamental knowledge about the regulation of stem cells in the nerve tissue of zebrafish embryos results in surprising insights into neurodegenerative disease processes in the human brain. A new study by scientists at ...

Engineering new bone growth

Aug 19, 2014

MIT chemical engineers have devised a new implantable tissue scaffold coated with bone growth factors that are released slowly over a few weeks. When applied to bone injuries or defects, this coated scaffold ...

User comments