Model predicts risk of adverse events for ICD implantation

Model predicts risk of adverse events for ICD implantation

(HealthDay)—A simple model may be used to predict risk for in-hospital adverse events among patients receiving an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), according to research published online Dec. 11 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

John A. Dodson, M.D., of Harvard University in Boston, and colleagues used data from the National Cardiovascular Data Registry's ICD Registry to develop and validate a risk model for adverse events after ICD implantation.

The researchers found that 1.8 percent of patients undergoing ICD placement experienced at least one in-hospital complication or died. A prudent risk score, derived from 12 variables, characterized patients as low-risk (risk score of 10 or below; risk of complications, 0.3 percent) or high-risk ( of 30 or above; risk of complications, 4.2 percent). The risk-standardized complication rates for ICD placement varied significantly across hospitals (median, 1.77; fifth percentile, 1.16; 95th percentile, 3.15).

"In light of their carefully constructed and well-performing , Dodson and colleagues should be applauded for advancing our understanding of ICD procedural outcomes," write the authors of an accompanying editorial.

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