Gaps exist in patient-centered quality of CRC care at VA

Gaps exist in patient-centered quality of CRC care at VA

(HealthDay)—Patient-reported quality assessment measures reveal substantial gaps in patient-centered quality of colorectal cancer care, according to a study published online Feb 3 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Michelle van Ryn, Ph.D., M.P.H., from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and colleagues used the Veterans Affairs Central Cancer Registry to identify all patients with a new diagnosis of at any Veterans Health Administration medical center nationwide in 2008. Eligible patients (1,109) answered a questionnaire regarding aspects of patient-centered cancer care.

The researchers found that there were significant gaps in patient-centered quality of supportive care, starting with symptom assessment. Symptoms affected the impact of clinical factors and patient race on the odds of receiving wanted help. Independent of patient demographic or clinical characteristics, the quality of coordination of care predicted receipt of wanted help for all symptoms.

"Improving quality measurement of supportive care and implementing patient-reported outcomes in quality-measurement systems are high priorities for improving the processes and outcomes of care for patients with cancer," the authors write.

One author disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.

More information: Abstract
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