ARRS: Women overestimate radiation risk from mammogram

ARRS: women overestimate radiation risk from mammogram

(HealthDay)—Women tend to overestimate the radiation risk associated with mammography, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Roentgen Ray Society, held from May 4 to 9 in San Diego.

Jacqueline Hollada, from the University of California in Los Angeles, and colleagues surveyed 133 women presenting for annual mammography during a three-month period to ascertain their knowledge of the ionizing radiation associated with breast imaging. Participants were asked to rate the amount of radiation in a single mammogram relative to a series of radiation benchmarks. Five benchmarks were chosen to provide an approximately logarithmic scale with the value of a mammogram at the center (0.4 mSv). The benchmarks were ranked according to radiation, with 1 the highest and 6 the lowest.

The researchers found that none of the 78 women who responded to the benchmark question ranked all six radiation benchmarks correctly. Women overestimated the radiation associated with a mammogram compared with the other benchmarks. The correct rank for mammogram was 3.5, which was significantly different from the average rank given of 2.9 (standard deviation, 1.2; P < 0.0001). There was no significant difference among those with or without college education, or for those reporting that they had or had not received sufficient explanation.

"Using everyday sources of as benchmarks can help add perspective and improve patients' understanding of levels associated with mammography, thereby reducing anxiety related to the examination," Hollada said in a statement.

More information: Abstract
More Information

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Mammogram most effective 12 months after radiation treatment

Nov 25, 2008

Breast cancer patients who receive breast-conserving therapy and radiation do not need a follow-up mammogram until 12 months after radiation, despite current American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and National Comprehensive ...

Scatter radiation from mammography presents no cancer risk

Nov 27, 2012

The radiation dose to areas of the body near the breast during mammography is negligible, or very low, and does not result in an increased risk of cancer, according to a study presented today at the annual meeting of the ...

3D technology takes next step beyond traditional mammography

Apr 20, 2012

MILWAUKEE - After already having been through breast cancer treatment, Michelle Luckiesh did not think twice when doctors at Waukesha Memorial Hospital told her they had a new mammography device that may be able to detect ...

Recommended for you

Generation of tanners see spike in deadly melanoma

11 hours ago

(AP)—Stop sunbathing and using indoor tanning beds, the acting U.S. surgeon general warned in a report released Tuesday that cites an alarming 200 percent jump in deadly melanoma cases since 1973.

Penn team makes cancer glow to improve surgical outcomes

11 hours ago

The best way to cure most cases of cancer is to surgically remove the tumor. The Achilles heel of this approach, however, is that the surgeon may fail to extract the entire tumor, leading to a local recurrence.

Cancer: Tumors absorb sugar for mobility

23 hours ago

Cancer cells are gluttons. We have long known that they monopolize large amounts of sugar. More recently, it became clear that some tumor cells are also characterized by a series of features such as mobility or unlikeliness ...

User comments