Journal of Experimental Medicine

The Journal of Experimental Medicine is a peer-reviewed academic journal published by the Rockefeller University Press that publishes research papers and commentaries on the physiological, pathological, and molecular mechanisms that encompass the host response to disease. The journal prioritizes studies on intact organisms and has made a commitment to publishing studies on human subjects. Topics covered include immunology, inflammation, infectious disease, hematopoiesisas, cancer, stem cells and vascular biology. The JEM is second highest (based on impact factor) among the journals that publish basic research articles from all fields of biomedicine. Among all biomedical journals (specialized or nonspecialized) JEM stands among the top 10. The JEM was founded in 1896 at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine by William H. Welch, the school’s founder and also the first president of the Board of Scientific Directors of the Rockefeller Institute (since re-named the Rockefeller University). From its inception, Welch edited the journal by himself—even editing manuscripts while attending baseball games—and he eventually found that it placed too heavy a burden on his time. By March 1902, the

Publisher
Rockefeller University Press
Country
United States
History
1896–present
Website
http://www.jem.org/
Impact factor
14.776 (2010)

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Medical research

Stopping lung damage before it turns deadly

If you've ever struggled to breathe, you've had a moment of hypoxia—a lack of oxygen. Hypoxia can have long-term effects. In fact, doctors describe hypoxia as an "initial insult."

Genetics

Researchers discover serious gene defect in Inuit populations

A newly discovered gene defect among people of Inuit ancestry in Greenland, Canada and Alaska will possibly lead to screening of all newborn Inuits as they will otherwise be at risk of dying from child vaccines or simple ...

Overweight & Obesity

Can weekly prednisone treat obesity?

Obese mice that were fed a high-fat diet and that received prednisone one time per week had improved exercise endurance, got stronger, increased their lean body mass and lost weight, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study. ...

Medications

Treating tough tumors by exploiting their iron 'addiction'

Researchers at the University of California, San Francisco, have successfully leveraged an FDA-approved drug to halt growth of tumors driven by mutations in the RAS gene, which are famously difficult to treat and account ...

Immunology

New way viruses trigger autoimmunity discovered

Autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and Type 1 diabetes are thought to arise when people with a genetic susceptibility to autoimmunity encounter something in the environment that triggers their immune systems ...

page 1 from 40