Molecular & Cellular Proteomics

Molecular & Cellular Proteomics is a monthly peer-reviewed scientific journal established in 2002 and published by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. It covers research on structural and functional properties of proteins, especially with regard to development. The journal also publishes other content such as "HUPO views", which are reports from the Human Proteome Organization (HUPO), proceedings from HUPO meetings, and the proceedings of the International Symposium On Mass Spectrometry In The Life Sciences. As of January 2010, the journal is published online only and no longer available in print. The editors-in-chief are A.L. Burlingame and Ralph A. Bradshaw. All articles are available free 1 year after publication. In press articles are available free on its website immediately after acceptance.

Publisher
American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Country
United States
History
2002–present
Website
http://www.mcponline.org/
Impact factor
8.350 (2010)

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Could doctors at fertility clinics be giving men bad advice? Dr. Da Li and Dr. XiuXia Wang, who are clinician-researchers at the Center for Reproductive Medicine of Shengjing Hospital in Shenyang in northeast China, think ...

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