Cold medicine not for little children

March 2, 2007

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta cautioned against giving cough syrup or cold medicine to children younger than 2 years old.

Cough and cold medicine doesn't appear to work on very young children and has been linked to three deaths in 2005 and 1,500 emergency room visits in 2004 and 2005, the CDC said in a statement on its Web site.

"While these drugs are effective in older children and adults, there is little evidence these drugs help in children under 2 years old," the CDC statement said. "Parents should always consult a healthcare provider before giving cough or cold medicine to kids under 2 years old."

The agency also said the healthcare providers should use caution when giving the medicine to young children.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Serum Institute's vaccine demonstrates significant efficacy against severe rotavirus

Related Stories

Serum Institute's vaccine demonstrates significant efficacy against severe rotavirus

September 26, 2017
Results from a Phase 3 efficacy study in India of the Serum Institute of India Pvt. Ltd.'s rotavirus vaccine BRV-PV (known as ROTASIIL) were published in the journal Vaccine. The study showed the vaccine to be safe, well ...

Is manuka honey really a 'superfood' for treating colds, allergies and infections?

September 18, 2017
Manuka honey is often touted as a "superfood" that treats many ailments, including allergies, colds and flus, gingivitis, sore throats, staph infections, and numerous types of wounds.

Home visits help new parents overcome tough histories, raise healthy children

August 24, 2017
Seated at a kitchen table in a cramped apartment, Rosendo Gil asked the young parents sitting across from him what they should do if their daughter caught a cold.

Many parents don't tell doctor about 'Complementary' therapy use in kids

August 29, 2017
(HealthDay)—Parents often try unconventional treatments—such as acupuncture and herbal products—when their kids are sick, but many don't tell their pediatricians about it, a new report shows.

Harvey's floodwaters harbor many health hazards

August 30, 2017
(HealthDay)—Texans trapped in the unprecedented flooding wrought by Hurricane Harvey now face untold health hazards, officials say.

Telemedicine visits save families time and money

September 15, 2017
Patients and families who use telemedicine for sports medicine appointments saved an average of $50 in travel costs and 51 minutes in waiting and visit time, according to a new study by Nemours Children's Health System. Each ...

Recommended for you

Fighting opioid addiction in primary care—new study shows it's possible

October 18, 2017
For many of the 2 million Americans addicted to opioids, getting good treatment and getting off prescription painkillers or heroin may seem like a far-off dream.

With no morphine, 25 million die in pain each year: report

October 13, 2017
Every year, some 25 million people—one in ten of them children—die in serious pain that could have been alleviated with morphine at just a few cents per dose, researchers said Friday.

Study finds few restrictions on Rx opioids through Medicare

October 9, 2017
Medicare plans place few restrictions on the coverage of prescription opioids, despite federal guidelines recommending such restrictions, a new Yale study finds. The research results highlight an untapped opportunity for ...

Nocebo effect: Does a drug's high price tag cause its own side effects?

October 5, 2017
Pricey drugs may make people more vulnerable to perceiving side effects, a new study suggests—and the phenomenon is not just "in their heads."

Pre-packaged brand version of compounded medication to prevent preterm births costs 5,000 percent more

October 2, 2017
Preventing a preterm birth could cost as little as $200 or as much as $20,000, depending on which one of two medications a doctor orders, according to a new analysis from Harvard Medical School.

Cancer drugs' high prices not justified by cost of development, study contends

September 12, 2017
(HealthDay)— Excusing the sky-high price tags of many new cancer treatments, pharmaceutical companies often blame high research and development (R&D) costs.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.