ATP is a key to feel warm temperature

October 8, 2009

A Japanese research group led by Prof. Makoto Tominaga and Dr. Sravan Mandadi (National Institute for Physiological Sciences: NIPS) found that ATP plays a key role in transmitting temperature information from skin keratinocytes to afferent sensory neurons. Their findings were presented in the Pflugers Archiv European Journal of Physiology published on October 1, 2009.

Hazardous temperatures (extreme hot or cold) are known to be detected by the temperature-activated (thermoTRPs) expressed in free sensory nerve endings. On the other hand, ambient innocuous warm temperatures are sensed by different thermoTRPs, TRPV3 and TRPV4 expressed in skin keratinocytes. Interesting question is, therefore, how our nervous system recognizes the warmth information sensed by the non-excitable epithelial cells.

In a co-culture system, heat-evoked response in DRG neurons was secondary to that in skin keratinocytes, and the DRG responses were diminished by the receptor antagonists. ATP release from keratinocytes was confirmed by 'a bio-sensor system' in which a cell expressing ATP receptors was placed in close proximity to keratinocytes. Warmth-activated TRPV3, rather than TRPV4, was found to be predominantly involved in the ATP release upon heating.

Dr. Tominaga said, "Our findings for the first time explains how ambient temperature information can be sent from skin to . Our results also support the emerging concept of ATP-mediated information transmission in the non-synaptic connections."

Source: National Institute for Physiological Sciences

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Urine test developed to test for tuberculosis

December 14, 2017
(Medical Xpress)—An international team of researchers has developed a urine test that can be used to detect tuberculosis (TB) in human patients. In their paper published in Science Translational Medicine, the group describes ...

40 years after first Ebola outbreak, survivors show signs they can stave off new infection

December 14, 2017
Survivors of the first known Ebola outbreak, which occurred in the Democratic Republic of the Congo in 1976, may be key to development of vaccines and therapeutic drugs to treat future outbreaks, according to a new study ...

Lactic acid bacteria can protect against Influenza A virus, study finds

December 13, 2017
Lactic acid bacteria, commonly used as probiotics to improve digestive health, can offer protection against different subtypes of influenza A virus, resulting in reduced weight loss after virus infection and lower amounts ...

Aging impairs innate immune response to flu

December 13, 2017
Aging impairs the immune system's response to the flu virus in multiple ways, weakening resistance in older adults, according to a Yale study. The research reveals why older people are at increased risk of illness and death ...

Lyme bacteria survive 28-day course of antibiotics months after infection

December 13, 2017
Bay Area Lyme Foundation, a leading sponsor of Lyme disease research in the US, today announced results of two papers published in the peer-reviewed journals PLOS ONE and American Journal of Pathology, that seem to support ...

Drug blocks Zika, other mosquito-borne viruses in cell cultures

December 12, 2017
If there was a Mafia crime family of the virus world, it might be flaviviruses.

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Rick69
not rated yet Oct 08, 2009
It would have been nice if this article would at least have some speculation on how this research could have some practicle applications. An example would be that often times elderly people feel the need to turn the heat up excessively in the winter, resulting in wasted energy, high heating bills, etc. How could this research address this problem?

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.