Novel compound found effective against avian influenza virus

February 26, 2010

A novel compound is highly effective against the pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus, including some drug-resistant strains, according to new research led by a University of Wisconsin-Madison virologist.

The work, published in the Public Library of Science journal on Feb. 26, suggests that the compound CS-8958 is a promising alternative antiviral for prevention and treatment of bird flu.

are a primary countermeasure against human influenza viruses, including the highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus, which causes . Emerging strains resistant to existing drugs, particularly (Tamiflu), pose a threat and make the development of alternate antivirals a pressing public health issue, says Yoshihiro Kawaoka, a professor of pathobiological sciences at the UW-Madison School of Veterinary Medicine and senior author of the new study.

Kawaoka and a group of researchers from Japan, Vietnam, and Indonesia tested a novel neuraminidase inhibitor R-125489 and its prodrug CS-8958, which had previously shown potent activity against seasonal influenza viruses in laboratory animals.

Working with mice, the researchers found that a single intranasal dose of CS-8958 given two hours after infection with H5N1 influenza virus resulted in a higher survival rate and lower virus levels than a standard five-day course of oseltamivir. CS-8958 was also effective against highly pathogenic and oseltamivir-resistant strains of H5N1 virus.

In addition to its therapeutic use, CS-8958 also protected mice against lethal H5N1 infection when given seven days before infection with the virus.

"This compound requires only a single administration for both treatment and prophylaxis. Such prophylaxis would be highly desirable for seasonal influenza as well as a potential pandemic situation," says Kawaoka.

Although follow-up studies will be needed to confirm the applicability of the findings to humans, "CS-8958 is highly effective for the treatment and prophylaxis of infection with viruses, including oseltamivir-resistant mutants," the authors conclude.

More information: Kiso M, Kubo S, Ozawa M, Le QM, Nidom CA, et al. (2010) Efficacy of the New Neuraminidase Inhibitor CS-8958 against H5N1 Influenza Viruses. PLoS Pathog 6(2): e1000786. doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1000786

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Migraines may be the brain's way of dealing with oxidative stress

October 19, 2017
A new perspective article highlights a compelling theory about migraine attacks: that they are an integrated mechanism by which the brain protects and repairs itself. Recent insightful findings and potential ways to use them ...

New insights into herpes virus could inform vaccine development

October 18, 2017
A team of scientists has discovered new insights into the mechanisms of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, as well as two antibodies that block the virus' entry into cells. The findings, published in Proceedings of the National ...

Pair of discoveries illuminate new paths to flu and anthrax treatments

October 17, 2017
Two recent studies led by biologists at the University of California San Diego have set the research groundwork for new avenues to treat influenza and anthrax poisoning.

Portable 3-D scanner assesses patients with elephantiasis

October 17, 2017
An estimated 120 million people worldwide are infected with lymphatic filariasis, a parasitic, mosquito-borne disease that can cause major swelling and deformity of the legs, a condition known as elephantiasis. Health-care ...

New tools to combat kidney fibrosis

October 16, 2017
Interstitial fibrosis – excessive tissue scarring – contributes to chronic kidney disease, which is increasing in prevalence in the United States.

How hepatitis C hides in the body

October 13, 2017
The Hepatitis C (HCV) virus is a sly enemy to have in one's body. Not only does it manage to make itself invisible to the immune system by breaking down communication between the immune cells, it also builds secret virus ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.