Inflammation marker related to obesity is elevated in patients with pancreatic cancer

February 3, 2010, Thomas Jefferson University

The levels of an inflammatory chemokine were significantly elevated in patients with pancreatic cancer who were extremely obese, according to research conducted by scientists at the Jefferson Pancreatic, Biliary and Related Cancers Center. They presented their data at the 5th Annual Academic Surgical Congress, held in San Antonio.

Studies have shown that obesity is correlated with . Similarly, studies have also shown that inflammation contributes to the of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA). This study looks at the role of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), a marker of inflammation, in with pancreatic cancer.

Hwyda Arafat, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of Surgery at Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, and colleagues sought to identify whether MCP-1 could serve as a marker for pancreatic cancer, and a differentiation marker between benign and malignant lesions.

The research team analyzed the MCP-1 levels in serum samples obtained from patients with confirmed PDA or intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN). They found that the levels of MCP-1 were significantly elevated in extremely obese patients. In the less obese population (BMI < 37.5), the mcp-1 levels were elevated only in patients with pda. in the patients who had ipmn, high levels of mcp-1 also correlated with older age.

"MCP-1 has potential as a for pancreatic cancer, but this needs to be confirmed in a larger sample size," Dr. Arafat said. "Further study of this protein in a larger sample size and different benign and unresectable is needed. Understanding the nature of the relationship of its elevation with age and the highest levels of obesity will assist with the full development of the potential clinical usage of this marker."

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Researchers use a molecular Trojan horse to deliver chemotherapeutic drug to cancer cells

February 23, 2018
A research team at the University of California, Riverside has discovered a way for chemotherapy drug paclitaxel to target migrating, or circulating, cancer cells, which are responsible for the development of tumor metastases.

Study tracks evolutionary transition to destructive cancer

February 23, 2018
Evolution describes how all living forms cope with challenges in their environment, as they struggle to persevere against formidable odds. Mutation and selective pressure—cornerstones of Darwin's theory—are the means ...

Lab-grown 'mini tumours' could personalise cancer treatment

February 23, 2018
Testing cancer drugs on miniature replicas of a patient's tumour could help doctors tailor treatment, according to new research.

An under-the-radar immune cell shows potential in fight against cancer

February 23, 2018
One of the rarest of immune cells, unknown to scientists a decade ago, might prove to be a potent weapon in stopping cancer from spreading in the body, according to new research from the University of British Columbia.

Putting black skin cancer to sleep—for good

February 22, 2018
An international research team has succeeded in stopping the growth of malignant melanoma by reactivating a protective mechanism that prevents tumor cells from dividing. The team used chemical agents to block the enzymes ...

Cancer risk associated with key epigenetic changes occurring through normal aging process

February 22, 2018
Some scientists have hypothesized that tumor-promoting changes in cells during cancer development—particularly an epigenetic change involving DNA methylation—arise from rogue cells escaping a natural cell deterioration ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.