FDA warns 8 companies marketing miracle cures

October 14, 2010

(AP) -- The Food and Drug Administration has warned eight companies to stop marketing miracle cures that claim to treat everything from autism to Parkinson's disease by flushing toxic metals from the body.

Regulators said the products, sold over the Internet, can cause dehydration, and death. Known as chelation therapies, the products have been used for decades, although medical societies and government experts say there is no evidence they cure diseases.

The only FDA-approved chelation therapies are used to treat lead and mercury poisoning.

"These products are dangerously misleading because they are targeted to patients with serious conditions and limited treatment options," said FDA's Deborah Autor, director of compliance. "The FDA must take a firm stand against companies who prey on the vulnerability of patients seeking hope and relief."

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RobertKarlStonjek
1 / 5 (3) Oct 14, 2010
"The FDA must take a firm stand against companies who prey on the vulnerability of patients seeking hope and relief."
...and yet they let the church do exactly that? Looks like a double standard in play in the USA...
Sherry_A
5 / 5 (2) Oct 15, 2010
I am glad there are warnings now I have been told to try different things with my special needs children. Many claim to be "cure alls"

Robert
apparently you have something against churches. I do not see the connection.
ironjustice
not rated yet Oct 16, 2010
Increased metal retention has been linked to many different diseases. Alzheimer's Parkinson's and Huntington's disease to name just three. The FDA by saying chelation has "no purpose" is simply unbelievable coming from the medical perspective. The argument of possible danger IN the supplements themselves but the remark of "no purpose" smacks of lack of intelligence and / or ignorance of medical FACTS ."High Iron Levels Identified in Brains of Alzheimer's Patients""Parkinson's Disease Linked To High Iron Intake""Increased iron levels have been demonstrated in the basal ganglia of manifest Huntington's disease (HD)""The important role of iron in the development of tuberculosis"
marjon
2.3 / 5 (3) Oct 16, 2010
.and yet they let the church do exactly that? Looks like a double standard in play in the USA...

And yet the FDA doesn't regulate politicians who make promises they can't keep and force you to pay for.
There is no church in the USA that can force its members to do anything. The govt can and does use force.
JSC22
not rated yet Oct 19, 2010
If it sounds too good to be true then it probably is. Being healthy doesn't come in pill or one type of "wonder" pill or drink. It take effort and time, but like anything worth having the effort is well worth it. This fantastic blog has some easy tips to get you started on health or maintaining your health: blog.mydiscoverhealth.com
Javinator
5 / 5 (1) Oct 19, 2010
...and yet they let the church do exactly that? Looks like a double standard in play in the USA...


And yet the FDA doesn't regulate politicians who make promises they can't keep and force you to pay for.


FDA: Food and Drug Administration.

How they should responsible for religion and politics is beyond me...

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