Tips for lower calorie beverages offered by Loyola dietician

December 21, 2010

Some of the most popular holiday drinks are loaded with calories. But there are simple ways to limit the damage. Here are some tips on how to enjoy five popular holiday drinks, according Brooke Schantz, a Loyola University Health System registered dietitian.

• Eggnog (8 oz.) Calories: 343. Total fat: 19 g. Healthy solution: Buy a reduced-fat version or make your own eggnog using egg whites.

• Hot Chocolate (12 oz., with whole and whipped cream). Calories: 310. Total fat: 16 g. Healthy solution: Use non-fat milk and skip the whipped cream and marshmallows.

• Peppermint Mocha (16 oz., with 2 percent milk and whipped cream). Calories: 400. Total fat: 15 g. Healthy solution: Add 1 tablespoon of Coffee-mate seasonal flavor peppermint mocha to your cup of joe instead.

• Pumpkin Spice Latte (16 oz., with 2 percent milk and whipped cream). Calories: 380. Total fat: 13 g. Healthy solution: Order a smaller size and sip slowly.

• Champagne (8 oz.). 156 . Toast in the New Year in moderation. The more you drink, the higher the calorie count, and the more likely you will be to overindulge in food.

"It's OK to treat yourself to your favorite holiday drink," Schantz said. "But try to do it in a way that won't bust your waistline."

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Ratfish
5 / 5 (1) Dec 21, 2010
How about water?

Additionally, this article implies that the fat content is to blame, when actually fat provides satiety, even in liquid form. It's the carbohydrates in these drinks that are the problem.

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