Alcohol helps the brain remember, says new study

April 12, 2011

Drinking alcohol primes certain areas of our brain to learn and remember better, says a new study from the Waggoner Center for Alcohol and Addiction Research at The University of Texas at Austin.

The common view that drinking is bad for learning and memory isn't wrong, says neurobiologist Hitoshi Morikawa, but it highlights only one side of what ethanol consumption does to the brain.

"Usually, when we talk about learning and memory, we're talking about conscious memory," says Morikawa, whose results were published last month in The Journal of Neuroscience. "Alcohol diminishes our ability to hold on to pieces of information like your colleague's name, or the definition of a word, or where you parked your car this morning. But our subconscious is learning and remembering too, and alcohol may actually increase our capacity to learn, or 'conditionability,' at that level."

Morikawa's study, which found that repeated ethanol exposure enhances synaptic plasticity in a key area in the brain, is further evidence toward an emerging consensus in the neuroscience community that drug and alcohol addiction is fundamentally a learning and memory disorder.

When we drink alcohol (or shoot up heroin, or snort cocaine, or take methamphetamines), our subconscious is learning to consume more. But it doesn't stop there. We become more receptive to forming subsconscious memories and habits with respect to food, music, even people and .

In an important sense, says Morikawa, alcoholics aren't addicted to the experience of pleasure or relief they get from . They're addicted to the constellation of environmental, behavioral and physiological cues that are reinforced when alcohol triggers the release of dopamine in the brain.

"People commonly think of dopamine as a happy transmitter, or a pleasure transmitter, but more accurately it's a transmitter," says Morikawa. "It strengthens those synapses that are active when dopamine is released."

Alcohol, in this model, is the enabler. It hijacks the dopaminergic system, and it tells our brain that what we're doing at that moment is rewarding (and thus worth repeating).

Among the things we learn is that drinking alcohol is rewarding. We also learn that going to the bar, chatting with friends, eating certain foods and listening to certain kinds of music are rewarding. The more often we do these things while drinking, and the more that gets released, the more "potentiated" the various synapses become and the more we crave the set of experiences and associations that orbit around the alcohol use.

Morikawa's long-term hope is that by understanding the neurobiological underpinnings of addiction better, he can develop anti-addiction drugs that would weaken, rather than strengthen, the key synapses. And if he can do that, he would be able to erase the subconscious of addiction.

"We're talking about de-wiring things," says Morikawa. "It's kind of scary because it has the potential to be a mind controlling substance. Our goal, though, is to reverse the mind controlling aspects of addictive drugs."

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Bigblumpkin36
5 / 5 (3) Apr 12, 2011
I'm drinking Jack right now and i can't remember a dam thing that this article said about membering stuff.
trippingsock
not rated yet Apr 12, 2011
"certain areas of our brain to learn and remember better"
especially if we had a good time, lets do it again and again.. isn't it an addiction pattern?
pauljpease
1 / 5 (1) Apr 12, 2011
I love this article because it falls under one of my favorite sayings which goes a little like "just because something feels a certain way doesn't mean it actually is that way". People forget that feelings can be wrong (in the sense that they can guide us in the wrong direction). If it feels good, it might not actually be good, and if it feels bad, it might not actually be bad. Also leads to the conclusion that successful and happy are two totally different things (one is based on an objective measure and the other on a subjective measure). It just depends on whether the things that make one "successful" also make them feel good or not. I think that research has shown that what makes people successful (working extremely long hours, etc.) also tends to decrease happiness. This is what the progressive movement is based on, moving the objective measure of success closer to the subjective measure of happiness, but that obviously is short-sighted because bad things can make us feel good too
Ricochet
not rated yet Apr 13, 2011
Wasn't there another study that proved alcohol changes the way memories are encoded, and that those memories created while highly inebriated may not be accessible unless you are again highly inebriated?
pip010
not rated yet Apr 17, 2011
I liked best : "People commonly think of dopamine as a happy transmitter, or a pleasure transmitter, but more accurately it's a learning transmitter," says Morikawa. "It strengthens those synapses that are active when dopamine is released."
indeed breakthrough, however the title is more than misleading. the connection is dopamine and the fact it is probably the most powerful neuro transmitter
semmsterr
not rated yet Apr 18, 2011
I happen to be studying right now. Perhaps an... experiment, is in order?
Ricochet
not rated yet Apr 21, 2011
I believe that Douglas Adams did extensive research in this area...

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