Hospitals ranked for emergency medicine quality

February 23, 2012
Hospitals ranked for emergency medicine quality
Report found patients admitted through the best ERs had significantly lower death rates.

(HealthDay) -- Patients admitted to the top hospitals for emergency medicine in the United States have a nearly 42 percent lower death rate than those admitted to other hospitals in the nation, according to a new report.

If all hospitals performed at the same level as the top-ranked hospitals, nearly 171,000 more people in the United States might have survived their emergency hospitalization between 2008 and 2010, according to HealthGrades, an independent provider of consumer information about doctors and hospitals.

Researchers analyzed more than 7 million Medicare patient records from 2008 to 2010. The patients were admitted to the hospital through the emergency department for the following diagnoses: bowel obstruction, , diabetic acidosis and coma, gastrointestinal bleed, heart attack, , pancreatitis, pneumonia, pulmonary embolism, , sepsis or stroke.

The report also found that emergency-room admissions for heart attack decreased 1.7 percent between 2008 and 2010, while admissions for stroke increased 2.2 percent. It also found that more than 61 percent of among seniors begin in the emergency department, the highest of all age groups.

The 10 cities with the lowest risk-adjusted death rates for patients admitted through the were: Milwaukee; Phoenix-Prescott, Ariz.; Cincinnati; West Palm Beach, Fla.; Baltimore; Traverse City, Mich.; Dayton, Ohio; Cleveland; Fargo, N.D.; and Detroit.

"It is imperative that anyone experiencing a medical emergency go directly to the closest hospital, especially in the event of a heart attack or stroke," report author Dr. Arshad Rahim, director of accelerated clinical excellence at HealthGrades, said in a company news release.

"That said, our study findings show the care you receive once admitted to the hospital can also make the difference between life and death," Dr. Rahim added. "We encourage all patients to educate themselves about the quality of emergency medical providers in their area and to choose a top-performing hospital whenever there is a choice."

Explore further: Doctors' decisions on initial hospital admissions may affect readmission rates

More information: The U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality advises you to do your homework before choosing a hospital.

Related Stories

Doctors' decisions on initial hospital admissions may affect readmission rates

May 13, 2011
Researchers compared hospitalization rates and rehospitalization rates of patients admitted for heart attack and for heart failure. Heart attack admissions are considered non-discretionary, whereas, heart failure admissions ...

Re-admission rates via emergency rooms climbing among patients who have recently been hospitalized

June 1, 2011
Emergency department patients who have recently been hospitalized are more than twice as likely to be admitted as those who have not recently been in the hospital, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine ...

Most hospitals miss critical window for heart attack transfer patients

November 28, 2011
Most heart attack patients transferred between hospitals for the emergency artery-opening procedure called angioplasty are not transported as quickly as they should be, Yale School of medicine researchers report in the first ...

Recommended for you

Number of older people with four or more diseases will double by 2035, say researchers

January 23, 2018
A study published today in Age and Ageing, the scientific journal of the British Geriatrics Society, reports that the number of older people diagnosed with four or more diseases will double between 2015 and 2035. A third ...

Placental accumulation of flame retardant chemical alters serotonin production in rats

January 22, 2018
A North Carolina State University-led research team has shown a connection between exposure to a widely used flame retardant chemical mixture and disruption of normal placental function in rats, leading to altered production ...

Marijuana use does not lower chances of getting pregnant

January 22, 2018
Marijuana use—by either men or women—does not appear to lower a couple's chances of getting pregnant, according to a new study led by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers.

Women run faster after taking newly developed supplement, study finds

January 19, 2018
A new study found that women who took a specially prepared blend of minerals and nutrients for a month saw their 3-mile run times drop by almost a minute.

Americans are getting more sleep

January 19, 2018
Although more than one in three Americans still don't get enough sleep, a new analysis shows first signs of success in the fight for more shut eye. According to data from 181,335 respondents aged 15 and older who participated ...

Wine is good for you—to a point

January 18, 2018
The Mediterranean diet has become synonymous with healthy eating, but there's one thing in it that stands out: It's cool to drink wine.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.