Hospitalizations up for severe skin swelling

March 6, 2012
Hospitalizations up for severe skin swelling
Called angiodema, the condition often affects the deep layers of skin in the eyes and mouth.

(HealthDay) -- Hospitalizations from angiodema, a serious swelling of the deep layers of the skin often around the eyes and mouth, are on the rise, new research finds.

Researchers from New York Downtown Hospital searched a national database for hospitalizations due to allergic reactions including hives, anaphylaxis (a potentially fatal whole-body reaction) and angiodema.

While for the other stayed the same from 2000 to 2009, angiodema rates doubled, according to the study, scheduled for presentation Tuesday at the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology meeting in Orlando.

Adverse reactions to ACE-inhibitors, a blood pressure medication, could be part of the problem, said lead study author Robert Lin in an academy news release.

Being black, having congestive heart failure, kidney disease, and older age were also associated with a greater risk of angiodema.

Experts note that research presented at meetings has not been subjected to the same type of rigorous scrutiny given to research published in peer-reviewed medical journals and should be considered preliminary.

Explore further: Many asthmatics do well on food-allergy tests, study finds

More information: For more on angioedema, visit the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

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