10 percent of total funding for children should be moved to preventive interventions within 5 years

April 24, 2012, Lancet

A Comment linked to The Lancet Series on Adolescent Health calls for major investments in adolescent health, including moving 10% of total funding for children and adolescents towards preventive interventions in communities and schools within 5 years. It also calls for at least 30% of countries produce their own reports on adolescent health and development compared with the less than 5% that currently do so. The Comment is by Professor Michael Resnick, Division of Adolescent Health and Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA, and lead authors from each of the four Series papers already mentioned in this press release.

The authors say: "Adolescence is central to global health goals for physical, mental, sexual, and reproductive health, reductions in injuries, incidence of HIV, and chronic substance misuse. At least 70% of premature adult deaths reflect behaviours started or reinforced during adolescence. The burgeoning challenge of non-communicable diseases linked to obesity, , early elevations in blood pressure, tobacco and substance use, and mental disorders pose worldwide threats to health, since two-thirds of [all global] deaths are linked to non-communicable diseases."

They conclude: "About half of the world's population is now younger than 25 years, with substantial proportions in low-income and middle-income countries. How nations harness the contribution of their adolescents and young adults will determine their futures, in terms of economic success and quality of life. Put simply, failure to invest in the second decade of life, despite the availability of proven and promising prevention and health promotion strategies, will jeopardise earlier investments in , substantially erode the quality and length of human life, and escalate human suffering, inequity, and social instability."

Explore further: Up to 1 in 5 children in developing countries has a mental health problem, yet treatment is woefully inadequate

Related Stories

Up to 1 in 5 children in developing countries has a mental health problem, yet treatment is woefully inadequate

October 16, 2011
Mental health problems affect 10-20% of children and adolescents worldwide. Despite their relevance as a leading cause of health-related disability in this age group and their longlasting effects throughout life, the mental ...

Paper calls for more to be done to help young people with depression

February 1, 2012
Depression is one of the most common mental health problems in young people worldwide, but it often goes unrecognised and untreated. Left untreated, adolescent depression increases the risk of suicide, substance abuse, and ...

Changing old attitudes to aging and making aging well a global priority

April 3, 2012
This year's WHO World Health Day will be on healthy ageing, with the official launch on April 4 ahead of the actual World Health Day on April 7. Correspondence published Online First by The Lancet shows that not only must ...

Breaking the cycle: Studies show improving mental health status helps improve financial status

October 16, 2011
The first paper in The Lancet Series on Global Mental Health reviews the negative cycle of interaction between mental ill health and poverty in low-income and middle-income countries (LMIC). A review of published work shows ...

Adolescent expectations of early death predict young adult socioeconomic status

April 10, 2012
(Medical Xpress) -- Adolescents' expectations of an early death can predict their economic futures more than a decade later, according to a new study from the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health.

1 in 12 teenagers self-harm but most stop by their twenties

November 18, 2011
(Medical Xpress) -- Despite self-harm being one of the strongest predictors of completed suicide, 90% of young people who self-harm as adolescents cease self-harming once they reach young adulthood. However, those who start ...

Recommended for you

Women run faster after taking newly developed supplement, study finds

January 19, 2018
A new study found that women who took a specially prepared blend of minerals and nutrients for a month saw their 3-mile run times drop by almost a minute.

Americans are getting more sleep

January 19, 2018
Although more than one in three Americans still don't get enough sleep, a new analysis shows first signs of success in the fight for more shut eye. According to data from 181,335 respondents aged 15 and older who participated ...

Wine is good for you—to a point

January 18, 2018
The Mediterranean diet has become synonymous with healthy eating, but there's one thing in it that stands out: It's cool to drink wine.

Sleep better, lose weight?

January 17, 2018
(HealthDay)—Sleeplessness could cost you when it's time to stand on your bathroom scale, a new British study suggests.

Who uses phone apps to track sleep habits? Mostly the healthy and wealthy in US

January 16, 2018
The profile of most Americans who use popular mobile phone apps that track sleep habits is that they are relatively affluent, claim to eat well, and say they are in good health, even if some of them tend to smoke.

Improvements in mortality rates are slowed by rise in obesity in the United States

January 15, 2018
With countless medical advances and efforts to curb smoking, one might expect that life expectancy in the United States would improve. Yet according to recent studies, there's been a reduction in the rate of improvement in ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.