New portable tool detects dengue infected mosquitoes in the field

May 21, 2012

(Medical Xpress) -- A new portable tool to detect dengue virus-infected mosquitoes will help reduce the likelihood of human infections around the world.

Each year, almost 1 million people, a large proportion of whom are children, require hospitalization for severe dengue.

The simple diagnostic tool, developed by Dr. David Muller and colleagues from The University of Queensland and research groups in Melbourne and South America, can be used in the field to detect dengue infection in of mosquitoes.

“Unlike other approaches to mosquito surveillance, this new tool provides information on whether are carrying dengue,” Dr. Muller said.

“It is rapid, specific, and does not require specialised equipment or personnel.

“This means it will be viable for use in developing regions of the world where dengue is a significant health and economic burden,” he said.

Almost half of the world's population is at risk of contracting the virus which is transmitted to humans by the bite of an infectious female mosquito.

Over 100 million people each year are infected globally, which can result in mild debilitation through to the life-threatening complications of dengue haemorrhagic fever.

Suppressing mosquito populations is one way that local authorities try to reduce transmission of the , and finding the location and incidence of infected populations allows a rapid response to control the spread of the disease.

Professor Paul Young, leader of Dr. Muller's team at the Australian Infectious Diseases Research Centre, said that rigorous field testing was still being conducted.

“The goal of this work is to provide the tools to not only assess mosquito numbers in the field but also their infection status," he said.

"This information could then be directly uploaded with GPS information via mobile devices to coordinating centers.

“The availability of real-time monitoring of dengue presence within the mosquito population would be a valuable addition to early warning monitoring programs and should result in more effective mosquito control responses by local health authorities,” Professor Young said.

News of the new has been published in the international Journal of Virological Methods.

Explore further: Dengue virus turns on mosquito genes that make them hungrier

Related Stories

Dengue virus turns on mosquito genes that make them hungrier

March 29, 2012
Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have, for the first time, shown that infection with dengue virus turns on mosquito genes that makes them hungrier and better feeders, and therefore possibly ...

Specialized mosquitoes may fight tropical disease

August 24, 2011
Scientists have made a promising advance for controlling dengue fever, a tropical disease spread by mosquito bites. They've rapidly replaced mosquitoes in the wild with skeeters that don't spread the dengue virus.

Recommended for you

Time to drop 'complete the course' message for antibiotics, experts argue

July 27, 2017
The deeply embedded message that patients should "complete the course" of antibiotics to avoid antibiotic resistance is not backed by evidence and should be dropped, argue experts in The BMJ today.

Phase 3 trial confirms superiority of tocilizumab to steroids for giant cell arteritis

July 26, 2017
A phase 3 clinical trial has confirmed that regular treatment with tocilizumab, an inhibitor of interleukin-6, successfully reduced both symptoms of and the need for high-dose steroid treatment for giant cell arteritis, the ...

A large-scale 'germ trap' solution for hospitals

July 26, 2017
When an infectious airborne illness strikes, some hospitals use negative pressure rooms to isolate and treat patients. These rooms use ventilation controls to keep germ-filled air contained rather than letting it circulate ...

Researchers report new system to study chronic hepatitis B

July 25, 2017
Scientists from Princeton University's Department of Molecular Biology have successfully tested a cell-culture system that will allow researchers to perform laboratory-based studies of long-term hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections. ...

Male hepatitis B patients suffer worse liver ailments, regardless of lifestyle

July 25, 2017
Why men with hepatitis B remain more than twice as likely to develop severe liver disease than women remains a mystery, even after a study led by a recent Drexel University graduate took lifestyle choices and environments ...

Mind-body therapies immediately reduce unmanageable pain in hospital patients

July 25, 2017
Mindfulness training and hypnotic suggestion significantly reduced acute pain experienced by hospital patients, according to a new study published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.