Researchers to speed up recovery times

May 3, 2012

Elite athletes and recreational exercisers alike could soon be enjoying quicker recovery times thanks to research into exercise-induced fatigue.

The study of and metabolism stands to benefit elite athletes in their daily training programmes and during intensive periods of competition, as well as the wider population of people who are exercising to improve their health and fitness.

It’s the latest in a series of studies by Dr James Betts and his team which aim to better understand the mechanisms of during exercise. They are particularly looking at the effects of repeated bouts of demanding exercise which don’t allow an adequate break for full physical recovery.

“We aim to inform athletes’ recovery routines both when training frequently in the lead-up to the Olympics but also during the Games itself, when there is a need to complete many fixtures or events within a short period,” said Dr Betts.

The research team is monitoring repeated exercise bouts and the effects of various nutritional interventions to discover which ones are most effective at supporting the recovery processes.

“It’s fascinating that many entirely familiar whole-body responses and behaviours remain so poorly understood in terms of their underpinning physiological mechanisms,” said Dr Betts. “Fatigue in humans and particularly within skeletal muscle is a prime example of this. Media coverage isn’t always accurate and many people are often surprised to realise how little we do actually know. This makes it both interesting and worthwhile to find out.

“What’s exciting with this study is that we are making so many varied measurements in the same piece of research, from measuring the concentration of key hormones in blood, and energy levels within muscle, to monitoring changes in central nervous system activation.”

The team believes that aside from its applications for elite athletes, the research will help recreational exercisers to keep on track. “We are all acutely aware of our physical limitations, whether in terms of how fast we can run to catch a bus or how much time and how many breaks we need to budget to complete daily tasks. If our work can help to produce better guidelines and strategies that speed recovery it’s also likely to help people sustain an plan, because if they feel better quicker they’re less likely to return to sedentary lifestyles.”

Explore further: New tool enhances view of muscles

Related Stories

New tool enhances view of muscles

January 23, 2012
Simon Fraser University associate professor James Wakeling is adding to the arsenal of increasingly sophisticated medical imaging tools with a new signal-processing method for viewing muscle activation details that have never ...

Recommended for you

Amber-tinted glasses may provide relief for insomnia

December 15, 2017
How do you unwind before bedtime? If your answer involves Facebook and Netflix, you are actively reducing your chance of a good night's sleep. And you are not alone: 90 percent of Americans use light-emitting electronic devices, ...

Warning labels can help reduce soda consumption and obesity, new study suggests

December 15, 2017
Labels that warn people about the risks of drinking soda and other sugar-sweetened beverages can lower obesity and overweight prevalence, suggests a new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health study.

Office work can be a pain in the neck

December 15, 2017
Neck pain is a common condition among office workers, but regular workplace exercises can prevent and reduce it, a University of Queensland study has found.

Regular takeaways linked to kids' heart disease and diabetes risk factors

December 14, 2017
Kids who regularly eat take-away meals may be boosting their risk factors for heart disease and diabetes, suggests research published online in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

Simulation model finds Cure Violence program and targeted policing curb urban violence

December 14, 2017
When communities and police work together to deter urban violence, they can achieve better outcomes with fewer resources than when each works in isolation, a simulation model created by researchers at the UC Davis Violence ...

Your pets can't put your aging on 'paws'

December 14, 2017
(HealthDay)—In a finding that's sure to ruffle some fur and feathers, scientists report that having a pet doesn't fend off age-related declines in physical or mental health.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.