Cetuximab, paclitaxel combo active in urothelial cancer

August 29, 2012
Cetuximab, paclitaxel combo active in urothelial cancer
The monoclonal antibody against epidermal growth factor receptor, cetuximab, augments the antitumor activity of paclitaxel in patients with previously treated urothelial cancer, according to a study published online Aug. 27 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

(HealthDay)—The monoclonal antibody against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), cetuximab, augments the antitumor activity of paclitaxel in patients with previously treated urothelial cancer, according to a study published online Aug. 27 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Yu-Ning Wong, M.D., of the Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia, and colleagues conducted a phase II, randomized, noncomparative study involving 39 patients with metastatic urothelial cancer to determine the benefits of salvage chemotherapy with cetuximab with or without paclitaxel.

In the single-agent cetuximab treatment arm, the researchers found that nine of 11 patients had progressed by eight weeks, and the arm was closed. For the 28 patients enrolled in the cetuximab plus paclitaxel arm, 12 experienced progression-free survival (PFS) longer than 16 weeks. The overall response rate was 25 percent, including three complete responses and four partial responses. The median PFS and overall survival were 16.4 and 42 weeks, respectively. Grade 3 and 4 treatment-related adverse events included rash in six patients, fatigue in five patients, and low magnesium in three cases.

"In conclusion, although cetuximab is inactive as a single agent in advanced urothelial cancer, it may augment the antitumor activity of paclitaxel when given in combination," the authors write. "The combination of paclitaxel and cetuximab should be compared with single-agent paclitaxel in a to establish the role of EGFR inhibition by in advanced urothelial cancers."

Several authors disclosed to Bristol-Myers Squibb, which funded the study and manufactures .

Explore further: High EGFR expression a predictor for improved survival with cetuximab plus chemotherapy

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

High EGFR expression a predictor for improved survival with cetuximab plus chemotherapy

July 5, 2011
High epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression was a good predictor of which lung cancer patients would survive longer when cetuximab (Erbitux) was added to first-line chemotherapy, according to research presented ...

Study combines lapatinib with cetuximab to overcome resistance in EGFR-driven tumors

May 16, 2012
Targeted therapies have been studied for years, but recent laboratory research is providing robust clues about drugs that might work better in combination, particularly in treating cancers that have become resistant to therapy. ...

Recommended for you

Outdoor light at night linked with increased breast cancer risk in women

August 17, 2017
Women who live in areas with higher levels of outdoor light at night may be at higher risk for breast cancer than those living in areas with lower levels, according to a large long-term study from Harvard T.H. Chan School ...

Scientists develop novel immunotherapy technology for prostate cancer

August 17, 2017
A study led by scientists at The Wistar Institute describes a novel immunotherapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancer based on the use of synthetic DNA to directly encode protective antibodies against a cancer specific ...

Scientists develop blood test that spots tumor-derived DNA in people with early-stage cancers

August 16, 2017
In a bid to detect cancers early and in a noninvasive way, scientists at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center report they have developed a test that spots tiny amounts of cancer-specific DNA in blood and have used it to ...

Toxic formaldehyde is produced inside our own cells, scientists discover

August 16, 2017
New research has revealed that some of the toxin formaldehyde in our bodies does not come from our environment - it is a by-product of an essential reaction inside our own cells. This could provide new targets for developing ...

Cell cycle-blocking drugs can shrink tumors by enlisting immune system in attack on cancer

August 16, 2017
In the brief time that drugs known as CDK4/6 inhibitors have been approved for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer, doctors have made a startling observation: in certain patients, the drugs—designed to halt cancer ...

Researchers find 'switch' that turns on immune cells' tumor-killing ability

August 16, 2017
Molecular biologists led by Leonid Pobezinsky and his wife and research collaborator Elena Pobezinskaya at the University of Massachusetts Amherst have published results that for the first time show how a microRNA molecule ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.