BMI and lean body mass decline after allogeneic HSCT

October 4, 2012
BMI and lean body mass decline after allogeneic HSCT
In survivors of childhood hematologic malignancies who have received allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, body mass index decreases significantly, mainly due to a reduction in lean, not fat, body mass, according to research published online Oct. 1 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

(HealthDay)—In survivors of childhood hematologic malignancies who have received allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT), body mass index (BMI) decreases significantly, mainly due to a reduction in lean, not fat, body mass, according to research published online Oct. 1 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Hiroto Inaba, M.D., Ph.D., of the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, Tenn., and colleagues conducted a involving 179 survivors of childhood hematologic malignancies who had received alloHSCT. The authors sought to evaluate changes in body mass and over time.

After a median of 6.6 years of follow-up, the researchers found that BMI z scores declined significantly over time. Mean z scores for lean mass remained below normal levels and decreased significantly over time, while the mean z scores for fat mass were within population norms. Post-HSCT BMI and fat and lean mass z scores were strongly predicted by pre-HSCT BMI category and/or z score. Low BMI and low lean body mass were more frequently found in survivors who had battled extensive chronic graft-versus-host disease. Older age at HSCT and receipt of T-cell-depleted grafts significantly predicted lower post-HSCT BMI. Compared with males, female patients had higher body fat and lower lean mass z scores, and black patients had higher fat mass z scores compared with white patients.

"In conclusion, we found a significant decline in BMI z scores after alloHSCT in survivors of childhood hematologic malignancies, primarily owing to a decrease in lean mass," the authors write. "We suggest that dietary education and exercise counseling are essential to improve the physical status and overall health of survivors with the risk factors identified in this study."

Explore further: Obesity epidemic in America found significantly worse than previously believed

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Obesity epidemic in America found significantly worse than previously believed

April 2, 2012
The scope of the obesity epidemic in the United States has been greatly underestimated, according to a study published Apr. 2 in the open access journal PLoS ONE. Researchers found that the Body Mass Index (BMI) substantially ...

Large waistlines can double the risk of death in kidney disease patients

July 12, 2011
For kidney disease patients, a large belt size can double the risk of dying.

Recommended for you

CAR-T immunotherapy may help blood cancer patients who don't respond to standard treatments

October 20, 2017
Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis is one of the first centers nationwide to offer a new immunotherapy that targets certain blood cancers. Newly approved ...

Researchers pinpoint causes for spike in breast cancer genetic testing

October 20, 2017
A sharp rise in the number of women seeking BRCA genetic testing to evaluate their risk of developing breast cancer was driven by multiple factors, including celebrity endorsement, according to researchers at the University ...

Study shows how nerves drive prostate cancer

October 19, 2017
In a study in today's issue of Science, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, part of Montefiore Medicine, report that certain nerves sustain prostate cancer growth by triggering a switch that causes tumor vessels ...

Gene circuit switches on inside cancer cells, triggers immune attack

October 19, 2017
Researchers at MIT have developed a synthetic gene circuit that triggers the body's immune system to attack cancers when it detects signs of the disease.

One to 10 mutations are needed to drive cancer, scientists find

October 19, 2017
For the first time, scientists have provided unbiased estimates of the number of mutations needed for cancers to develop, in a study of more than 7,500 tumours across 29 cancer types. Researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger ...

Researchers target undruggable cancers

October 19, 2017
A new approach to targeting key cancer-linked proteins, thought to be 'undruggable," has been discovered through an alliance between industry and academia.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.